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Nurses in Media Day 2023

This an annual event to increase your knowledge, skills, and confidence in engaging in media opportunities.



*Below is a lightly edited transcription of Nurses in Media Day 2023.*


 

Jared Fesler

Good morning and welcome to the second annual Nurses in Media Day 2023. This event is dedicated to increasing your knowledge, skills and confidence in engaging in media opportunities. You may be familiar with the Woodhall study conducted in both 1997 and 2017. And that study found that nurses are largely underrepresented in media features sources than only 2% and health related news stories down from 4% in 1997, and significantly lower than their physician counterparts at 18%.


Jared Fesler

Nurses in Media Day is a call to action for all nurses to learn to engage with media so our voices can be heard on issues concerning public and community health, our practice and our profession. Nurses In Media Day agenda will consist of three parts. First, the media policy and culture panel discussion, followed by media success stories from nurse advocates, as well as many media trainings to give you the actionable skills and tools to engage with media effectively.


Jared Fesler

We'd like to also thank our proud sponsors Nurse.org, the Working Nurse Magazine, and The Nursing Beat for their amazing support in bringing nurses voices to the forefront of the conversation.


Jared Fesler

Today, I'm going to be introducing fellow Alicia Truelove, who will moderate today's panel discussion...


Jared Fesler

TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIRES WERE EXPERIENCED. Some footage was lost.


Melissa Vizcarra

..as Kevin said, nurses versus doctors getting you know, media coverage, what we try to do on our end, we write a lot of our own content, and, you know, push it out to the media as well. So we posted it on our newsroom. But those stories that we write, we try really hard to balance it to have a nurse voice in there along with an MD or PhD as well. So whenever that and then, as a result, ideally, hopefully, you know, if media decide to pick up that story, they'll ask to interview the doctor or the nurse. Or we'll also just push it upon them and say like, oh, well, Dr. Stone says not available, but a nurse is.


Alicia Truelove

Thank you, those are really interesting points. And I appreciate you, Chantal and Melissa, Kevin for sharing. But Alice, we've heard from some of our communications experts, but coming from a nursing perspective, how can nurses best approach and engage their communication or immediate departments?


Alice Benjamin

Thank you so much for asking that question. First, I have to say I'm so delighted to see this. I'm Alice Benjamin and clinical nurse specialist, Family Nurse Practitioner, Chief Nursing, officer@nurse.org, and NBC for medical correspondent. And actually, as we're talking, I'm actually getting texts from NBC asking me if I could do a live hit, talking about pulling COVID. So I'm so excited to see nurses embracing media.


Alice Benjamin

When I started my journey. 14 years ago none of this was happening. It was unheard of, of nurses to be on television. So you can imagine, my journey is a lot different. So it's so refreshing to hear now, the collaboration, the support from the leadership and communications team, because when I started, I, I had some mentors in the media industry. But I was a passionate nurse who just wanted to continue to educate the public, just like we do at the bedside, but do it on a different platform.


Alice Benjamin

But now knowing, you know, as I learned the hard way, I if I could do it a little bit differently. Some of the things I would recommend to nurses interested in doing this is to one first, make sure that you've read all the policies and procedures at your facility. So you are familiar and you are aware of what's in writing.


Alice Benjamin

Two, then I would say, making the introduction with the communications or PR team at your respective facility or hospital. Let them know hey, I'm Alice Benjamin. I'm a clinical nurse specialists. I'm a family nurse practitioner, and I'm very passionate about X, Y, and Z and would love the opportunity to share that message internally, externally at health events on radio, podcast, digital and article, let's express your interest. And then from there, there will likely be a creative discussion about what does that look like? What is your availability? Do you have media coaching? Do you need training, and from there, just like we individualize a care plan, we would individualize I imagine you in the communications team a plan with how to move forward and to make sure that nurses are represented well, that the hospital or the organization is represented well in the various forms of platforms that are out there.


Alice Benjamin

But I think it's really important that whatever it is you decide to do in the media, recognize that as nurses, you're representing the profession. If you're doing it in collaboration with your facility, you are representing the facilility, and just as you would orient on a unit, where's the crash cart? Where's the Med Room? Where's this, I think it's also very important that you familiarize yourself with the media that you're using. So I did, I do television, radio. And so part of that included journalism training and courses for me. So I think there's so much and you guys are gonna get some wonderful training later, from some great experts, one of them one of my real good besties, Dr. James Simmons.


Alice Benjamin

But I think, you know, first identifying that this is something you want to do, and then collaborating with your communications team, because it's gonna look different for different people. Some people do really good with doing pre recorded interviews, some good are good at live interviews, which I'll be doing shortly here for another 45 minutes on NBC. But I think the most important part is recognizing that, as a nurse, you have so much to offer, lean on your skill set, lean on your passion, and work collaboratively with your communication team, and be open to additional training, media coaching, and then just deliver the best message you can.


Alicia Truelove

That was so great. And just really briefly, are there any ways that nurses can demonstrate their media skills and establish their credibility?


Alice Benjamin

Well, I think I know, we're already credible, because you're a nurse, you're a licensed health care professional, where the largest segment of the healthcare workforce, and I think the pandemic really, you know, shed even more light on to the value of nurses and what we really do. But as some of the other panels, were saying, we have nurses and other sectors that do other things. So it's not just one thing, just about the bedside bedside is very important. But there are other things that we do when it comes to taking care of people in different settings, different types of work.


Alice Benjamin

But I would say lean into your, obviously your your nursing license, but your specialty, whatever it is that you specialize in, when I started this journey as a clinical nurse specialist, cardiovascular health was my passion. I'd been a longtime spokesperson for the American Heart Association. I was on previously on the board for AMA California. So I did a lot of talk about a lot of practice and workplace issues. So whatever your experience has been, your specialty has been leaned into that. And I think that is what adds credibility to your story. Because as I talk on television, with HIPAA in mind, obviously, will reflect on different experiences that I've had. And I think as we're talking about particular subjects, being able to share an example, being able to share even some of your own personal experiences are something that adds to the story, and then really causes the viewers and listeners to lean in.


Alice Benjamin

And I think that's also, I'll say this in my journey, because I wasn't a position, you'll notice that historically, white male positions, were the ones on television, I'm not a physician, I'm not white, and I'm a nurse, and a person of color. So I had, there were lots of barriers. But I think when you have the opportunity and a platform to tell a story, people can tell when you're passionate when you're sincere about something. And I think, you know, lean into that, that, you know, the, the trust the the amount of time that nurses spend with patients, they tell a story that they don't tell them their positions, right, wait, I'm sure many people on the on the call can attest to that, though, you know, they want to hear from us, they trust us. And when you can share some of those stories, HIPAA, HIPAA compliance.


Alice Benjamin

You know, people really tune in, they listen. And you know, also in making sure that you incorporate health literacy, I was using health literacy before I knew health literacy was a term living room language. And I think that's something else, that the viewers appreciate, being able to receive information in a manner in which they can understand and is applicable and usable to their everyday consumer living. So in in nursing and healthcare, we have some big words, big terms. But I you know, I make it simple for the viewers, and I'm gonna deliver the information. This is what you can do. And just also, I want to say, when it comes to your specialty, again, whatever your specialty is, there's so many things to talk about in health care. I'm sure there are plenty of things that you can talk about, based on your nursing experience. I mean, you've you've taken care of how many different types of patients you've been in how many different types of encounters there's, there's a lot that you can talk about. So I don't want anyone on this call to say, Well, I'm not sure that I'm qualified to talk about it. You're a nurse, you're qualified.


Alicia Truelove

Those are great points Alice and thank you for all of that contribution.


Alicia Truelove

I have a next question for Melissa. We heard from our members and we conducted communications policy analysis.


Alicia Truelove

Basically, we want to know how nurses can best engage their media and communication departments to support both their profession and the institution. Specifically when it comes to speaking out on difficult topics.


Unknown Speaker

so if we can hear, yeah,


Unknown Speaker

I,


Melissa Vizcarra

I felt like Alice hit a lot of these points already really, you know how I mentioned earlier, we are being proactive, but we need just the same, you know, collaboration from nurses. And don't be afraid to reach out. Because regardless of the size of the institution, I can guarantee you that there is someone or a team of someone's who are handling, communications, PR marketing. So just finding who that person is, and reaching out with whatever your idea might be, or your story, or maybe it's none and you're just interested in like, hey, I really, you know, want to be a part of your speaker's bureau or something, you know, if there's ever an opportunity that I could, you know, talk to XYZ. I think that is the first thing though, because, again, I can't emphasize this enough, like, we really just rely on our nurses to tell us what is happening, and what are those stories that we need to be telling and sharing.


Melissa Vizcarra

And then on top of that, I think that knowing that there are resources for you, we're not just going to throw you out there, you know, the media training, there's, or if you just if you just want to, you know, an info interview with your whoever you're leading the comms department reach out, because chances are most people in this enroll PR role love to talk, so you know, have coffee with them and just establish that relationship. I can't tell you how many nurses have become my friends as well, because they just, you know, reached out and said, like, Hey, I have this idea. I don't know if it's a thing if we should do anything. And then now they are my go to is that I call if we do get media requests, or if I do need an expert on whatever the topic might be.


Melissa Vizcarra

I'm just gonna say a story or an example of that, oh, I have so many, but there's, you know, a nurse who, there was a patient who was an amputee, and he really wanted to meet, or he really wanted to, excuse me become a firefighter. And she, the nurse went out of her way and coordinated this whole, like, meeting with the sheriff or the fire department, excuse me, the Chief Fire Department, and there was someone else involved as well. But, you know, we shared that story, not just about this patient who was aspiring to be a firefighter. But the fact that the nurse, you know, went out of her way to set up this whole elaborate event, and just showing Yes, what she does, but the kind of care that so much more than just the medical care that we're providing here, at Cedars and elsewhere. So that's an example of one story, I guess. But there's so many more just because a nurse picked up the phone or sent an email and said like, I don't know if this is a thing, but might beawesome.


Alicia Truelove

Thank you, Melissa.


Alicia Truelove

Speaking on that Chantal, we also found that sometimes nurses experience a perceived fear of retaliation when speaking up or speaking out. How can we reduce that pristine fear of retaliation that nurses may feel when engaging in media opportunities?


Chantal Roshetar

Yeah, I mean, I think that we're just gone through a very unique situation, right with a pandemic. And there are a lot of examples out there. Fortunately, not a city of hope that we will do that. But so many, so many examples of nurses and other frontline workers across the country, we are telling you that against flipping out on important issues, like the shortages and other concerns that were coming up for the first time during COVID. So I definitely agree that there's got to be some residual theater coming out with that.


Chantal Roshetar

But I think it makes having good media policies and procedures in place that much more important. As well, as you know, most uncovering report customer comments, as well as very strong relationships with your communications department. You know, the City of Hope I leave for the year relations team, and I have a really strong relationship with our chief nursing officer, it was actually the relationship was strengthened even more during COVID. And just as, you know, the nature of working having to work so closely together and working on all the new policies and doing quick videos for patients on, you know, educating them and, you know, we're continuously working in the major with our nursing leadership. All of those managers that are, you know, are going to be the voice that so many of the nurses listen to day in and day out. So the leaders know


Chantal Roshetar

The less and they understand how to work with us, that's going to trickle down to the greater nursing workforce and eliminate the fear. So just talking about, you know, I know, we did that review of policies, you know, when it comes to our policy that we have built, it's a very clear policy, it's very straightforward in that all interaction with the media of any nature from person online, and the topic should go for media relations. And part of that kind of clarity there, you know, it's partly to help protect our nurses, or doctors or scientists, because we know how busy they are, they're taking care of our patients or working in their labs, the last thing they should be doing in dealing with reporters directly or having a set of interviews or worrying about security and HIPAA forms, and we take that off their shoulders.


Chantal Roshetar

And then the other part is, you know, we're here to protect the institution reputation are here to protect the individual working for us, including the nursing or wanting to protect their reputation. So having us on man to evaluate, you know, if we should be engaging politically, is also that we're, that's our job. So we're there to support everyone. So that's, to me, that's what the policy should really instill is that was there to help. And, you know, I think it tends to limit confusion, having one everyone understand the policy, or at least their leader does. And if they don't, they can ask the question or direct them right up to us. If you get a media request, you know, reach out, we put that and then we go from there. Same thing. On the other side, there's something that you want to proactively engage with me on, you know, like we were saying before, or something that you're passionate about, or at somebody's a space that you just want to be a part of, which is amazing. Again, reaching out to us will help in the final angle will help me work through messaging, messaging, or coaching, prepping for interviews, generally, we're very encouraging to go forward with either incoming requests or, or outcome.


Alice Benjamin

Alicia, if I could just add to that, it's so you know, I'm so glad that we're having these conversations now. Because 15 years ago, when I started my journey, these were things that weren't talked about in the forefront. So I learned about these things, real time, as a nurse, we, you know, committed to my professional nursing organization, and a committed to the American Heart Association, because of my special in cardiology, I was very active.


Alice Benjamin

This mind you, we don't have we don't have Instagram wasn't around. And guys, okay, so just let's make sure that that's in there as well. But you know, this was really, you know, Twitter chats, this was television, radio, blogs, and things like that. So as a nurse, we all have our own individual lives. And I think this is really important, I think, in full transparency to make this a very well rounded conversation. Many nurses on here probably think, Well, I'm not at work, I'm doing for my time off, I don't need to communicate with my PR team. And that's how I operated at the time.


Alice Benjamin

And I will say this, although I will give some pushback to some things, I think there's some that's why I said you have to have a creative conversation with your communications team. It is important, especially if you're working at a hospital if you're not in like for example, I'm independent contractor I can do. And I have extensive media coaching. So I've learned different things, which is more on advanced level, but for nurses working in the hospital, working for a large organization, if you do want to do media, do a check in, because I think it's going to save you a lot of grief. If you have that community that conversation earlier versus later. I had my conversation later. And I just would like to save anyone any grief and pain from having you know, not knowing the policies, procedures not having being on the same page understanding because sometimes some things are on paper. There are there's meaning or definition or examples that may not be clear cut. So make sure you have that conversation with your communication team or your chief nursing officer.


Unknown Speaker

Should you decide that you really want to use me in the platform and which platforms are okay to use. So there's lots of questions. And again know, every hospital is gonna be a little bit different. Their communication seems going to be a little different. But again, if you are wanting to do media, make sure you read those policies have that check in and I clearly identify what's within scope of your ability to do well associated with that hospital.


Alicia Truelove

Thank you guys for all of that.


Alicia Truelove

You know, Kevin, I would want to listen to how you might be able to discuss this also. I personally have had an experience where I was approached by a media outlet, wanting to share my my story and journey in nursing. And I did briefly mention my organization, but I didn't speak any specifics to the organization itself. I just mentioned that by name. But I figured that I needed to speak to my communications team before I allowed them to publish. And unfortunately, I got a response that said, due to the organization not asking me to participate in this interview, they weren't, I wasn't allowed to continue with publishing the, the piece. So I just would want to hear maybe, from your perspective, are there any ways that nurses can navigate that topic?


Kevin Kimbrough

Yeah, I mean, I've had nurses coming to us, often, oftentimes, nurses, you know, especially in advanced practice, will publish, they'll work on journal articles, and they'll work on articles that end up getting published. Oftentimes, sometimes they don't mention the organization that they're connected to. But I think one of the ways that we end up hearing about them is that in our organization, we're very kind of part of the conversation with our leadership team with our nursing teams. And so we kind of make a point of making sure that people know who we are at our hospitals. And so it kind of like the Wizard of Oz, it's like the person behind the curtain. You know, we're visible on the leadership team meetings were in the halls were available. And so it's easy for the folks on our teams to know who to ask. And so a part of that culture thing.


Kevin Kimbrough

But in the case that you're talking about, if that was our organization, it would likely you know, understanding the context of the story, what is the story, what is the publication that it was going in, and if it painted you and the nursing profession, and because there was a mention of us, mainly because there was a mention of us, as a painted everybody in a positive light, that would be something that would be likely to prove, even if we weren't on it from the get go. And that will just be an opportunity for us to say, you know, whenever you do get approached before you go to spend a lot of your time on this. And if you are going to mention the organization, just so that there's no potential for not being able to participate in something that you might be passionate about, just give us a heads up. And we'll we'll talk about it together and collaborate on the end of the day. It's a positive story with a positive message that puts you in the profession and the organization. In a positive light, it benefits everybody to have that story told. So working together to figure out a way to do it is something that we're always really open to do.


Jared Fesler

I think this coaching sort of back into this right is really important to the live interviews. And Melissa, I know you mentioned previously meeting with the CNOs like Anita. And that's still happens even at that level, even given her title right before entering to any opportunities. So this is not just for the untrained, but this is kind of standard operating procedure to make sure everything is done copesthetically, right?


Melissa Vizcarra

That's exactly in fact, I needed just sent me something earlier this week, like sending it my way to, you know, to see like, Hey, should we shouldn't we do this? So it's again, from, as far as our policy, you know, we similar to chanteuse comments is that you know, we have, it's pretty clear what our policy is, if you're representing seniors in any way, like we need to know about it. And that's not to say, that's a hard, no are a hard Yes, either way, but just like that's what we're here for. That's the whole reason my job exists, is to help kind of navigate those waters.


Alice Benjamin

Jared, if I could just mentioned, you probably have several nurses on here who, you know, during the pandemic have launched their own businesses, their own company. So we have a lot of entrepreneurs online here, who also still may be working at a hospital as well. So to Alicia's point in her experience, if you're going to be doing media, do not mention your hospital, your clinic, anything of that sort unless you are actually have been in communication with their comms teams, and that that's who you're representing. That's the bottom line of it.


Alice Benjamin

Now, this can get a little muddy here, but I feel like it's we have this one time to say it. If you're representing your let's say you started a library, I don't know. And you're selling books, and you're on TV talking about books. I think when you do that, and you say, I mean I'll spend the honor of bookstore, A, B, C and D. That's how you're identifying. So I think a lot of what makes employers nervous is that they're concerned about the media training the message and what's going to be said that represents not only you as the nurse and the individual, but the profession and their hospital, you have to understand we're talking about brands.


Alice Benjamin

And if we're talking about media, let's be very clear. Media is a business. It's an entertainment business, it's an industry, we see how quickly media moves, we see the influence it can make, it can shift, thoughts, judgment purchases, there's a lot of financial impact in media as well. So just as much as we are on there talking about very important health and practice issues. It's a form of advertisement, it's a form of education. There are other business components to it that we as nurses don't learn in nursing school, which is why media coaching is very important, which is why I'm so thrilled that something like this exists now.


Alice Benjamin

So again, if you're a nurse's, I work per diem at this hospital, but I also have my own business. Media coaching is definitely something you want to do. And then also reading those policies, perhaps, you know, talking to your communications department, because there's a lot some gray area. In media, it's not very just clear cut. Okay, guys, so I just, I felt like I just wanted to say that I had such a captive audience, because I actually learned, like I said, real time, I had a lot of grief, a lot of things that I experienced, some unpleasant, but some, you know, that sometimes a setback is really the set up for success. And so I think it's really important that you guys take as many notes as you can today, Jared, I know, there's some coaching today, and hopefully a lot more from ANA\California on this very subject. Because we have a lot of great nurses, we have a lot of great stories to tell. And it's important that we remove as many barriers as possible. So they can do that.


Unknown Speaker

Yeah, absolutely.


Alicia Truelove

Yeah. And those were some really excellent points that I feel like really needed to be made. Nurse Alice, so with with that, the last question for you. Since you've had such great success in balancing these media opportunities with your own professional nursing role, how are some ways that you foresee media sources and health institutions working together to increase nurses representation in media overall.


Alice Benjamin

I think that the opportunities are endless. With working together, I think what gets in our way is ourselves. I think sometimes as nurses, we have this wealth of experiences, knowledge and the stories to tell we're X, you know, we're trusted by the profession, that we don't maximize and optimize our platforms to share such important messages. And then the slightest oopsie, or something, you know, unfavorable to the profession, and it sets us all back. So I think we all need to be more responsible with our platform.


Alice Benjamin

So I do mainstream mainstream television broadcast news. So and I'm in contract. So I, you know, there's a bit kind of a behavior clause in there. But everyone else, you don't have a behavior cloud, you can do what you want to do. It's your own platform. But I urge you, even though you're not clocked in on your shift are still a nurse. And so you represent your profession. And because of things like LinkedIn, and other things, even if you don't identify as a nurse from cedars or a nurse from City of Hope, or you know, a nurse from dignity, people can still find out who you are. So that's also why there's such a tight range.


Alice Benjamin

I also like to encourage the health care facilities, the hospitals, and I'm so thankful for the communication, the PR team, but you guys are still like such a small team, you do so much work you're responsible for so much. So I actually feel like you guys need more resources as well. And I don't know if your teams have an actual art a nurse on this on those types of teams. But I'm working more collaboratively with nurses in the sense that, you know, perhaps nurses come to you or perhaps a nurse might be identified but maybe doing more of a general type of educational piece because there might be nurses who are who may not have this on their radar, but can be ready at any given moment. So I think and really needed coaching is basically speech. It's a speech class, but it teaches you other things. For example, I don't know if you guys know Nancy Grace, I had an opportunity to talk with Nancy Grace, being able to study her delivery her and her interview style, being prepared for the different ways things stories can be spun, how to get out of difficult questions, how to make sure you deliver the message that you really want to say, there's so many opportunities, but it requires us collaboratively administrators, nurses, and our professional nursing organizations, which is why I love this so much that we all get together and try to remove as many barriers try to remove and empower people. I think most of the people who do meet, you know, who maybe made some oopsies or whoopsie. They're meant well, they met while they wanted to talk about patient care and how to keep people healthy, but perhaps they didn't do it exactly as their hospital would. But you have to recognize I hope hospitals recognize that the intention to do well is there and to not punish nurses like that. Um, but you know, we all got to sit at the table and have this collaborative conversation. But there's more. There's so many more things to talk about. I get asked all the time. I'm not available for television all the time I get other outlets that ask me, Do you know a nurse? Do you know a nurse? Yeah. Do you know nurses? Spanish, I work at NBC. I'm always asked for Spanish speaking nurses all the time. So if anyone speaks Spanish wants to do this, Hey, let me know. But Telemundo is always asking me for things. So I think there's several opportunities to talk on television, radio, and prints.


Alice Benjamin

I've been talking to nurses on television, talking about something important on Twitter or social media, whatever the case may be, it's an opportunity for that hospital to gain as well as the nurse to, you know, be able to contribute to public health issues. I like to put that stuff in public community health, because we're doing the service for the public.


Jared Fesler

Yeah. I mean, it always seems like we're talking about the tip of the iceberg here.


Alice Benjamin

Oh, yeah, there is so much more.


Jared Fesler

Yeah, right. Um, yeah, I just want to thank all four of you for having the time a to speak with us prior to this panel that was very helpful. And then to be able to invite you back to have this in more of a public forum and discourse, such incredible information. And I think a lot of this is brand new to nurses, or at least going to be very educational for them. So you know, Nurse Alice, Kevin Kimbrough, Melissa Vizcarra and Chantal Rosner, thank you so much for joining us and having some time to talk with our nurses today. Thank you.


Unknown Speaker

Thank you. Great.


Unknown Speaker

And with this,


Jared Fesler

it does mean that we're going to move into a little bit of an intermission, we will be returning, I'm just going to double check my account here, we're going to be returning at 1055. So just in about four minutes, give yourself some chance to use the restroom. Come right back. And next we'll be talking about success stories with nurses. So we'll see you soon. Thank you.


Jared Fesler

Welcome back, everyone. That was really quick, such an amazing session there with those panelists, conversation that we've been looking forward to for a very long time. This next part of our nurses immediate days is going to be talking about the immediate stories, immediate success stories, I should say. And I'm, I'm so excited about this. I'm looking right at you, Sharon.


Jared Fesler

And I know what we're gonna be talking about today, which is, you know, something that has been on my mind, from a communications perspective for so long, about the success that this is our shot has had. So Sharon, Dr. Sharon Goldfarb, thank you so much for joining us and being our first meet a success story to talk about today, if you don't mind, sort of just covering a little bit about your position in relation to this as our shot campaign, what that campaign was about, although I'm sure most people know, and we can dive into the details. Thank you.


Sharon Goldfarb

Thanks for having me. And I was just going to start by saying that I feel like every nurse is an advocate. And when you see things going on in the world that are troubling to you, your responsibility as an advocate in nursing is to make a difference. And there are lots of ways to make a difference. So personally, I started out my nursing career as an HIV nurse at the start of the AIDS crisis. And I saw a lot of my patients die. And, you know, the public kind of grappling with what is HIV and AIDS and social. There wasn't a real social media at the time, but there's plenty of media and there were a lot of like, disturbing stories at the time.


Sharon Goldfarb

And when COVID happened, I was still seeing patients and at unhoused shelter and again, I felt like a little bit of history repeating itself. But a lot of my patients to work getting COVID and passing away and more troubling than ever was now with social media. There was so much myths and disinformation and misinformation. It's kind of like where people really don't know the truth, this information is where people are really trying to change the narrative. There's some sort of political agenda or marketing agenda.


Sharon Goldfarb

So I was very lucky because I was approached by a few doctors who were starting a campaign called ThisIsOurShot. And this was a campaign that actually launched December 15, of 2020. And because we know that there are a lot of Spanish speakers, we actually also did a campaign called *****, which launched in January of 2021. And, you know, there's this famous saying about, if you're, you're not on the table, you know, bring up your own seat. So this was started by a lot of amazing doctors who now I really consider good friends of mine, but they didn't have a big nursing presence. And they talked a lot about how what research was showing was that providers have an 85% approval rating as trusted messengers. This was higher than anybody else higher than then the CDC higher than any organization that this trust really resided in providers. But we all know that the most trusted of all the providers are nurses, so to not have nurses at the table is a little bit crazy. So I kind of found myself at a meeting. And then I pretty much said, I need to be a leader here. And I need to promote what's going on. So what happened was that we really felt that part of the dialogue around the hesitancy around COVID, vaccines, and masking and all these things that happened at the start of COVID was that we wanted to promote trusted messengers, and trusted messengers being people in the health sciences. And it was really incredible because we hit tick tock, we hit Facebook, we hit with Twitter. And we had a lot of creative energy in these weekly meetings, to the point where we had 240 million impressions with these impressions.


Sharon Goldfarb

So it's very interesting because when you're a nurse who's used to patients and you're a nurse who is used to students, being put in the limelight is a very new experience and but I was really driven by the belief in the message in the belief of wanting to educate people so they would be safe, and we could save people and I think it's work that continues for COVID and lots of issues. I actually wrote my 97 condolence letter today for my friend's dad who just COVID So we're not through permission.


Sharon Goldfarb

So encourage you to join ThisIsOurShot shot or reach out to me. I think there are a lot of issues we need to be at the table about American Academy of Pediatrics just launched their new guidelines on pediatric obesity, saying that all kids over 14 who had failed medication and therapy should get gastric bypasses, I think global warming, she should be at the table talking about. So I do think there's a lot for us to say and do and happy to encourage and support in any way and thank you Jared for having me today.


Sharon Goldfarb

Yeah, of course, you know, I still have a couple of questions for you. But thank you for laying that groundwork. I mean, incredible reach here, right. And this is all a grass roots advocacy campaign. I remember when this is our shot had some of those very first emails that were coming out. Can you talk a little bit more about those early days how you actually got involved to talk to? And maybe even what some of those conversations sounded like? And in terms of how do we get nurses involved in his campaign and be that forward, facing presence? Well, I think when you're faced with a difficult time, you can engage in despair, or you can indeed, engage in like problem solving and change. And so the the really early conversations were like, What is going on? And what are we going to do about it? And


Unknown Speaker

I think that a lot of times, the conversation was very focused early on with doctors, what are doctors gonna say, and, and there was this thing of, I kept on saying, hey, you know, how many nurses there are in America, you activate nurses, and you'll, you'll have a lot more impact. And so I think there was a lot of discussion about how, what the messages were, and we did a lot of research, what's the best message to return? So there was this whole big thing about language, do's and don'ts, like you say, medical experts, instead of scientists, we really looked at a very granular level at the words you kind of use and what's going to engage people. And you know, there was a little conversation in the past that there was actually a lot of, there can be a lot of backlash. And it tried to get, you know, a certain amount of like, hate mail, and, but we actually built in how to support and how to how to deal with the people out there who had a, you know, a lot of animosity towards this movement. And I think there's just something about when you look at any problem, and you have a lot of smart people at the table from a lot of different disciplines. We actually had some times where we had a lot of fun, like, what's our this is our shot message going to be for Valentine's Day, you know, because Valentine's Day is like Cupid. Very, very connected. And, you know, one of the physicians who was one of the founders macing, Dr. Fauci, who I now consider a good friend is now an advisor for the Surgeon General's office. And the Surgeon General has 65 advisors, all of whom are physicians. So he's like, sure, I want you to advise me on the nursing voice for the Surgeon General's Office. So I think the more we make a noise and kind of follow our hearts and follow what makes us great nurses, the more impact we can have. And I've seen the reports also about the Woodhall study, it's not only that we're not called, we have to like kind of demand that we'd be there. And it's also that a lot of times when we do take to media or social media, we're very inward facing, we do content for other nurses. And what we really need to do is say, No, we're the experts, too. And we can go on and like, try to make this message be a public health message, not just like, engaging other nurses. And I mean, honestly, like, I love some of the nursing influencers on there. How many of you watch nurse Blake, he makes me laugh all the time. He's very directed to other nurses. And now he's on a speaking tour. So good for him. But I think if you're here in terms of the good of the profession, that good public health, think about how to craft a message that goes out into the bigger world.


Jared Fesler

Yeah, absolutely. You know, we Sharon, I mean, you're fully well and familiar with the advocacy world that ANA\California many nursing associations in California live in, and we talk all the time about how nursing can be siloed. And I think this is our shot campaign was a perfect example of a campaign that was working to break down those silos in a moment of big need. I think just a last sort of final closeout question here. Always wishing we had more time is is what would you do differently? Or what do you think in the startup of this campaign, or the longevity of this campaign? What could have been approached differently? Would you have reordered certain action items that you had? You know, what, from your perspective, what do you think you could have been done better?


Sharon Goldfarb

I mean, for me, there was a little bit of the balance of time, you know, like you have your day job, and you have your family life, and then you are doing this whole other thing. And I think there was a little bit about like, I wish I could have done more. And in the earlier discussion, people talked about media training. I don't feel like I needed media training because I teach and I'm good at being on stage. But what I really wish is I had more technical prowess of like, how to edit a video and how to sound edit a video on how to add images and you know, if I had more money, I would just hire someone professionally to do it, but I didn't have a lot of money to do that.


Sharon Goldfarb

But I think that if you are the kind of a person who's already sort of savvy and sort of knows how to edit a nice video or creek Tiktok video, yes, it's fun to deal with of like, what you're wearing or what you ate for dinner or having fun with your friends. It's also great to do what about public health messages. And I guess the real hard thing for me to grapple with is I think social media, on the whole has been a very bad thing for society. And I think when you look at one in three, you know, school aged kids are considering suicide, and that California alone is trying to hire 100,000 school counselors for the mental health crisis. And so much of it happens from what you look like at these images and how they're curated. That it's a little troubling to me that I took a tool that has, has harm and tried to use it as a tool for good. So I think it's all something we have to grapple with a little bit and we just continue doing.


Jared Fesler

Well, Dr. Sharon Goldfarb, thank you, for all your insights. Amazing story, I highly suggest Oh, great, thank you, Chelsea, for throwing in her LinkedIn. Connect with Sharon, if you haven't already. She's active everywhere and a great mentor all around. So Sharon, thank you so much for joining us.


Jared Fesler

So excited to bring on Tamara ally got seen from the nursing beat. Hi, Tamara, how you doing?


Tamara Al-Yassin

Good to see you.


Jared Fesler

You know, it's been fun watching your journey. I remember starting with ANA\California a few years ago, and you're over at Stanford, but now you're doing something completely different. You're away from the bedside. I feel like this is a story that many nurses need to hear. And probably some a lot of nitty gritty details and things to learn along the way. So if you don't mind, just give me a little bit of backstory of what The Nursing Beat is, you know what your position is and what that journey looked like from the bedside to where you are now.


Tamara Al-Yassin

Yeah, hi, everybody. First off, I have to say that it is really nice to be amongst some great leaders in nursing and in media. So first, and AC. Thank you for having me here. As Jared said, my name is Tamara Al-Yassin and I am the CEO of the nursing beat. We are a healthcare media organization and we curate the industry's only daily digital short form newsletter that's for nurses and allied professionals. I am a nurse myself, I've been a nurse for 11 years primarily in the emergency department. And while I was working during the pandemic, I really felt the desire to widen my professional options, and I decided to go back to business school. So I graduated from the University of Southern California with my MBA last year. And during this time, I quit the bedside to pursue this role as the CEO. I believe that nurses voices really need to be amplified, we are trusted, but a lot of times not in a decision making capacity. And that must change.


Tamara Al-Yassin

Nurses are really innately stronger together. And with this, I'm creating an authentic community at the nursing beat because our story matters, and we need a medium to share this. I also need I believe that our story needs to be told by us. So over the past year, we have built a nurse driven team at the nursing beat we have a nurse at every level of our organization. So from our board of directors to our executive team, to our content contributors. And honestly thinking back on it my journey in this role and within Media started long ago.


Tamara Al-Yassin

Actually a big part of my story is woven in and a California so I actually became an ANA\California member, oh man over 12 years ago in nursing school. So at the time, I was interested in health care policy. I attended RN lobby days, I got a legislative internship through an AC. I went to Washington DC for multiple years to advocate for health care legislation. And at the time, I didn't know that I was necessarily media training, I was just doing something I was really passionate about with really great people and learning along the way. But looking back sort of every moment was my media training. So over the course of those 10 years, I learned not only to advocate for myself, for my patients and then for my community. And my experience with ANA\California was definitely sort of the jolt I needed to realize that nurses go way beyond the bedside. That idea was instilled in me before I graduated with my bachelor's degree so the natural next step for me was to pursue leadership roles within the hospital. I tell you this long winded story to say that media training for nurses is really important. It needs to start early, honestly, in nursing school, and it's not leadership generally comes later in nursing curriculum, and we don't think about sometimes is that opportunities.


Tamara Al-Yassin

These opportunities in media are every day and they're everywhere. And it's all around you. It's sort of it's when you garner up the courage to advocate for a meal break, or when you go to your director in search of a solution for a problem is communicating with an MD to negotiate care in the best interest of your patient, your communication skills, your debate skills, your responsibility to represent our profession starts really at the beginning. And what is unique about our profession, and what makes it vital to be prepared for leadership is that we are representatives from the moment we enter nursing school, and nursing carries a lot of weight, and we need the right tools and the right resources. People, people often ask why would a nurse need media training? Honestly, when I went to business school, my classmates why asked why was even there. But these these questions are exactly why we need it, and why we need to relay our story effectively to the public. So they understand sort of the magnitude of what we are capable of doing.


Tamara Al-Yassin

A lot of people have said this actually here today, we're trusted. But are we respected to the degree that we should be? Are there enough nurses at the C suite? Are there enough nurse legislators? My answer is no. And a lot of times, we aren't the decision maker, I will speak for myself, I'm I'm really proud to be a nurse and for the care that I have given to my patients. But I wasn't necessarily prepared for the media until I started pursuing leadership opportunities, especially with ANA. And then after going back to school and pursuing this position with the nursing beat, I can come back a year later and reflect on the most important advice that will make nurses the most effective in media. And honestly, the number one is that you cannot do it alone. You need partners, you need mentors, you need allies with that shared vision to amplify our voices. I went from the bedside less than a year ago to being featured and Fast Company and the New York Times.


Tamara Al-Yassin

And this is done because I'm not alone. I have really great partners, and we all have a vested interest in our profession. And because what nurses says not say matters, we need the right people and organizations like Andy, California, to help us deliver that important messages. And honestly, it's also not just delivering the message, it's learning how to deliver the message effectively. And we sit we sit on this room on such a special day with so many talent, people who are masters in what they do. But I bet you that this day, was a domino effect of many days. And it starts with the task of having tough conversations at the bedside. You can't you if you can, if you can do it at the bedside, you can do it at the boardroom and you can do it within Media. I believe nursing issues need to be discussed more publicly more often. We're all advocates. And it's really important to transition our advocacy into media so that we have a seat at that table. Because it's necessary for our profession sustainability, honestly, in the past few years, if anything has taught me if I've learned anything in the past few years, it's that we are resilient. And our story deserves to be told and told by us.


Unknown Speaker

And welcome to the new host


Jared Fesler

of


Jared Fesler

The next question I was gonna ask you, you know, people choose away from the bedside and they continue care case management or something. You just told us exactly why you're so passionate about The Nursing Beat and getting nurses voices there. So I don't even need to cover that question anymore. But I do want to dive further into effective messaging, because I know a little bit about The Nursing Beat and you talk about a lot of different topics, all within a given week or given month.


Jared Fesler

What is your internal processes per se? Let's start maybe dive into that as internal team, how do you sort of define what your effective messaging tactics are going to be? Or is or do you have a process of sort of, okay, this is what we think about first to determine if this is going to be a good story.


Tamara Al-Yassin

Yeah, that is some of the most challenging parts of having a media organization is tackling really tough challenges and saying it right and why I'll honestly it's an all hands on deck, we have a massive board of advisors with multiple different skill sets that come from many different fields of nursing, not just bedside. And so when we have these problems, we come together and collectively decide how we are going to relay this message because it is challenging. You know, social media can be tough. And we do oftentimes, maybe say the wrong things in the wrong way, but have the right intent. And to be honest, over the past year, have we done it wrong? Sometimes? Yes, but we've learned from it, and we do it together?


Jared Fesler

Absolutely, you know, this is a common conversation. And within a cop, when you add policy or legislation to the conversation and the way, the gravitas of what you're considering and the words that you choose to become even heavier, right, and how you manage that over time has a direct reflection upon you as an organization. What are we what is something that you're doing a little different than you think? You know, there are there are a lot of publications that are out there talking about nursing issues. There are newsletters that talk about our future nurses? How can we bring nurses into life a little bit differently? Or what is the nursing be doing a little bit differently to try to do that?


Tamara Al-Yassin

Yeah, someone mentioned the term earlier: siloed. And sometimes our own profession is siloed, right? We have so many specialties. We have so many nursing organizations, we have nursing influencers, we have different nurses doing all sorts of things a different way. But we what the nursing beat wants to do is sort of pull in all of these resources onto one hop, because there isn't one way to do things. I do believe we need social media. I do believe we need to work with organizations, we do need to have great relationships with hospitals, and, and different organizations. So what what TNB is good at doing is pulling everybody together at the table.


Jared Fesler

And thanks for the acronym on that to say The Nursing Beat so often. Yeah. TNB. Yeah, Tamara, thank you so much. I mean, such great information here. As we think about creating better partnerships with health institutions, knowing that nurses live a lot within these institutions. How do we create those partnerships to help advance nurses voices, bring them to the forefront? I think you're doing a fantastic job. Thank you so much for joining us. Do you have any final remarks? Anything that that you want to say before you go?


Tamara Al-Yassin

Honestly, and no one's told me to say this, but thank you ANA\California California, I mean, you've literally been with me since I was 18 years old. always supporting me always check in with me. Sometimes we go months, and somebody's emailing me. And we just have a really strong community at ANA\C. And without you guys, a lot of this may have not happened for me or I wouldn't have been as prepared.


Jared Fesler

Wow. Thank you to my really appreciate your time. We'll have you back again soon.


Tamara Al-Yassin

Definitely. Thank you.


Jared Fesler

Thanks.


Jared Fesler

And we're moving on to the next one. And and on schedule and my ad for today, which is great for over three and a half hour event.


Jared Fesler

I've been excited this whole day. And I feel like I'm getting more excited as the day goes on, especially for this next conversation with Yvette Woodruff Perez.


Jared Fesler

You have had a very unique background and experience as a former mayor, so and during the pandemic, no less. So I think we've got a lot to cover and talk about today. From my perspective, so Yvette thank you so much for joining us and having some time with us today. Do you mind just covering as well, a little bit of backstory on yourself? Maybe even leading into that mayorship? And then we can dive into the media a little bit more.


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

Yeah, absolutely. Thank you for having me. And thanks for moderating Jared, this is an amazing opportunity to talk about my unique story. So it starts as an inexperienced nursing student who ran for public office. I won the election, I quickly became the youngest mayor of the city and then I landed at the White House. And the main message to everyone watching is if I can do it, you can too. Absolutely you can too. So follow me down memory lane for just a few in 2013. I had no political bone in my body whatsoever. It was my first semester of nursing school and I was looking for ways to come tribute to my household.


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

So essentially, I was looking for a part time job. My husband comes home one day and he says, Hey, I learned that there's this election coming up. And I think you should run. And I thought, Ron, Ron, where were we running to? What shoes do I wear? I will be the first to tell you that I had no idea what running for public office entail. I had no clue as to how to campaign, get alone run a campaign. But this was what I did. I assembled my team. We were very small but mighty. It was me. My husband, my next door neighbor, who was 90 years old. At the time, Miss Delphine Garza. bless her soul, she was such a huge proponent of nurses. I did my research, I learned the history of the city, I oriented myself to the legislative process, how local government worked, the city charter budgets, current bills that could impact my city and most important, what my community needed, similar to learning your patient's medical history and assessing their presenting symptoms, right, very, very similar.


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

So as I'm planning my campaign approach, I remember running for treasurer in high school many, many years back. And what worked back then I thought could work now. And that was baked goods in this is how naive I was back then to this whole campaign process. So I went out and I bought a couple of 100 cupcakes and pass them out to the community. And then guess what, not only did people open their doors to me, but when they learned that I was a nursing student, the response I received was no way. My grandmother was a nurse, my brother's a nurse, my sister's a nurse.


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

So I quickly realized that I had found my platform. As I went door to door, people were very interested in the fact that I was in school to be a nurse. And I was also prepared to answer questions and tell them why I was the best choice. I gained their trust through this platform, and I won the election. So for the next four years, I worked really hard for my constituents, I pass the NCLEX, and even began my first nursing job. And then one day came that special call, my office calls and says, You're never going to believe who just called for you.


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

It was the White House. Never in the history of the entire city council had someone been invited to the White House, we couldn't believe it. It was truly historic. And on that trip, I sat across from leaders of the free world in the most powerful house in the country, I participated in conversations that gave possible solutions to the ongoing opioid crisis, education, health care, and how I can help keep military families employed as they moved from base to base. And I did this as a nursing student without any initial experience. And my mission now is to persuade nurses to seek those political seats. I know that we generally don't go to nursing school to get into politics. But just like our last presenter said, we all have that leadership streak. And as registered nurses, the background and experience you possess, puts you way ahead of the game.


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

So get involved in government, because this is how we're gonna have a seat at the table. And not just any table, but at the table. So we really need you to get out there and push for better policy, shape health care, and most importantly, advance our profession. So in a nutshell, that's my that's my story.


Jared Fesler

That's a great story. And off of one question. Hey, all...


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

Right? That was it!


Jared Fesler

It's been awesome, because we're looking to have you at speak with our fellows. Back then I know I'm, of course, this is last year. So I'm forgetting if we were able to actually get you in front of them. But I remember your story about how this happened during the pandemic as well. And as you were mayor now needing to handle all these issues that were all coming in all at once. I know media requests was a part of that process, have that sort of daily weekly flow of things that you had to do and things that were on your plate. Can you talk a little bit about sort of managing that those media opportunities or, or what was that process internally for you as as it related to, you know, trying to have meetings to save lives and stuff like that?


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

Sure, absolutely.


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

So I found the most challenging part of media relations was checking my emotions before that light turned on. And my best advice that I can give people that are listening today is even before that happens, you should always ask yourself before any appearance, what do I want the narrative to be? That was my focus, and I never let media or anyone for that matter, knock me off of that focus. I'll give you a prime example. If I was ever asked a question that was invasive or not appropriate at the time, I redirected the focus to what I wanted the story to be.


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

My mantra is, luck favors the prepared. So everyone, remember that luck favors the prepared, I would do my homework. And that set me up to be able to handle myself, especially when media was involved, we usually had a good grasp of what potential questions would be asked, especially from specific media outlets, and a big part of media training was to always be prepared for any type of question. I will say that if you haven't been exposed enough to public speaking, the best choice is to search for a media training resource. And luckily, is I know this, ama, California has this available. So everyone watching, please reach out to them.


Jared Fesler

That's amazing. And thanks for the shameless plug here. We'll definitely hear more about that back coming up at the end of this event. Did you have just quick question, because this came up in the policy panel, they mentioned sort of these coaching sessions, that would happen prior to media opportunity. Did you have someone on your team or in your staff that you would work through these media opportunities with?


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

Yes, absolutely, I did. So I as soon as I began my term, one of the big things to accomplish was media training. So I was formally trained. And we did have somebody that would get together with us, if there was anything ever going on in the community, or anything that affected the city, they would meet with us in and we would just go over notes. But most importantly, mean you could go over notes, and people could talk to you about issues all day long. But if you don't get a handle on yourself and know how to manage yourself, when somebody asks a question, any type of question, then it all just goes downhill.


Jared Fesler

You know, there's so much to say, right? I mean, and again, we keep using the pandemic as a great example, because there was so many things to talk about. It's sort of what do you choose to say? How do you frame your message?


Jared Fesler

Luckily, we're going to have some many trainings right after this that dive a little bit into that. But as it relates to maybe these different types of media requests, and then you'd have local, you'd regional, even national papers that you were communicating with, sort of what does a in your own perspective, what does a little bit of preparation like that? Look, I know you say do your research, but what do you what are you thinking about as a nurse when you're approaching these mean opportunities?


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

Sure. I think as registered nurses, we are already exposed to many demographics, cultures, we know the disparities, and essentially, who gets what. So this exposure allowed me to understand my constituents and just be able to connect everything. We also have. As you may know, the nursing process. We have theoretical frameworks, evidence based research, and the more I progress through my own education, I learned of different models that helped me not only drive policy, but prepare me to speak in front of the media. I did find that even though I did have formal media training, I didn't have to learn from scratch, how to manage myself, in front of the media, the public in front of colleagues or even learning how to be influential. It was an easy transition for me simply because I did this as a registered nurse at the hospital every day with my patients. So that is the best training that you could have.


Jared Fesler

I love that. You know, any final lessons ... go back and look at this process again, becoming mayor and doing what you did. What would you do differently or and especially relating to these media opportunities? Of course, you know, what would you have changed anything about what you've done or the process of what you've gone through?


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

I think if I would have known how strong our platform was, I would have been advocating for more nurses to get into politics. My final messages. I hope my story motivated, many of you out there that are watching. I know we've had a rough couple of years. So please take the time to take care of yourselves be kind to one another. But please get out there, give us more visibility and really put our profession on the map.


Jared Fesler

That's amazing that thank you so much. Love the story. Love the perspectives. Thanks for joining us and having some time.


Yvette Woodruff-Perez

Thank you for having me, Jared.


Jared Fesler

Absolutely.


Unknown Speaker

The next up, we're going to invite a non nurse to have some words to say. We've been connecting with Kelly for quite some time now. Kelly DeMarco, thank you so much for joining us. exciting discussion here, as I mentioned non nurse newscaster, but here you are built your own. I call it a media empire.


Jared Fesler

Want to talk a little bit about your story, getting to the position that you're in now. Would you please enlighten us?


Jared Fesler

getting to the position that you're in now. Would you please enlighten us?


Kellie DeMarco

Absolutely. And I just want to say thank you so much for inviting me as the non nurse as the outsider here. But this is such a wonderful opportunity. I love hearing these discussions. And I love what you're doing for our community. So I just have to say thank you for what you do in general and taking care of our community. I really appreciate that. So my name is Kelly DeMarco, I have been a TV news anchor for about 20 years. I started my career in a little podunk town in Grand Junction, Colorado, as most newscasters do. We start in these little markets and kind of move our way up through the different markets, right.


Kellie DeMarco

So I ended up in Sacramento, I think I ended up here about 12 years ago. But over that time in 20 years, much like yourself, even though my path was different. I knew that I wanted to get into journalism. I was in business school, as well as my background and training was, but just like yourself, when I got to that first time on camera, I was a nervous wreck. I didn't know where to look. I didn't know what to say. I was like, Please, Lord, let me just get my name, right. I mean, that was literally what I was thinking. And I think my first story, I mean, how many people have seen Anchorman raise of hands. Anybody see the movie? Okay. A lot of that stuff is true, right? Like my first story was not the cat fashion show. But it was like, you know, a gas station giving out free oil changes, like breaking news, people in this little podunk town. However, it didn't matter because to me, I was so focused on all the things it's not just what you're going to say. But it's how you say it, how you look how you present yourself. And this is what I do now in my post TV career.


Kellie DeMarco

So what I did along the way, in every market, every station that I worked at is I really tried to find somebody outside of the TV station, who could help me figure out what to wear, how to do my makeup, how to do my hair, because look what you don't know, you don't know. And there is something to be said about that statistic you always hear which is people will make their opinions about you in the first three to five seconds, three to five seconds. Right. So if you do not look the part the rest is not going to comment. I know that sounds bad. I know. You know, I was hearing earlier about well, influencers on social media and you know, yes, we're we're educated on this. We don't need all this stuff.


Kellie DeMarco

But listen, guys, it's TV. It's a visual medium, right and so if you can take care of all these other pieces, which I'm going to be as we break out today I'm going to talk to you about basically how to dress the part how to look the part if you can take care of that I guarantee the confidence will come out in you. You will be more focused on what you have to say what you have to offer and really making a difference. So back to my you know first live shot that was horrible. I probably have it on tape smart system. My parents these VHS tapes. Yes, I'm aging myself.


Kellie DeMarco

Thinking I was just doing an amazing job. I cringe to go back and look at those tapes but I will say that So, over time, it gets easier. The more interviews you do, they get easier. And you just become more confident in what you're going to say. So, really, for me, and I think why Jared brought me here today to speak with you is because I come from the side of being prepared for these interviews, but also working with a lot of doctors and nurses in my time reporting.


Kellie DeMarco

And so as I worked my way through, and I'll just talk about my last tenure here, I worked at NBC affiliate KCRA, in Sacramento, and a lot of what we were looking for every single day, once I got past all the other stuff, right. So fast forward now to being more comfortable, I'm kind of really feeling at the top of my game is really looking for those meaningful stories, right, looking for those interviews. And when Jared and Chelsea and I first met, and I heard about nurses only being represented, and I think you said three to 4% of stories. Is that right? Jared?


Jared Fesler

Two percent.


Kellie DeMarco

Okay. So that just makes me think, gosh, you know, you're the ones on the front line. Why are we are always looking for the doctors, right? That's okay. Right, we want to mix. But there are so many stories to be told. So I want to talk to you today about Yes, how you look how you feel good what you say. But also know that the media is looking for content nonstop. And when you can offer them a great story, a great hook, and you can speak well. And you look the part. It's like gold, right?


Kellie DeMarco

And so I really encourage you to go on this journey. And if this is something that interests you, in your career, to really get out in front of cameras, and really help advocate for what you think is important. There is a need for you. So I don't know, Jared, what else you want me to add? Now, I guess I should talk about now in my post career. Because, you know, I love the TV business about three years ago. Yes, right before COVID, I was thinking 2020 is going to be the best year yet to start a business.


Kellie DeMarco

Which is we all know how that turned out. But what I love doing now as part of my media relations business, is a lot of what we're talking about today. So I do offer media training. And one of my favorite things to do is to help, I'm going to I mean, mostly, it's mostly women, I would say 95% of my clients are women in this realm is helping them go through the process of hair, makeup, clothes, and then presenting. And I know today we're going to learn about staying on message and getting those messages really clear. But it's so fun for me now, after 20 years in that space, to help women just like yourself. And I know there's a few guys on here too. So they help you to really look and feel your best, right? Because it's kind of like this whole picture. And if you're not put together and you don't feel confident, you don't feel good and prepared, then it's really going to show on TV, or radio or podcast or whatever medium you're going through. I felt like we should rename our session that you're going to do right here in this mini training next to the feel good look good session, rather than just looking at our best we could rename that title. So much looking forward to that. But I want to dive in a little bit further into how do you know, what is a good meaningful story? Or what are what are journalists and newscasters looking for? What are some elements to that story that nurses might be able to grab on and know for the next time they interact with a patient or another nurse? That's a great question. So I'm going to let you in on a little secret. Yes, there's a whole checklist of things that we go through in the newsroom when we figure out what stories we want to cover for the day.


Kellie DeMarco

But the number one, the number one way that we know if a story is going to be a good story is I just want you to think, why do I care? If you can just think in your mind, why do I care as in the viewer? If I'm watching this story, why do I care? Does it affect my children? As a mom, I'm watching is it a is it a effect their safety? With COVID? Obviously, there were a million different stories. COVID is kind of in its own planet, right? Because there was just so much going on and so much we didn't know, however, there was a range of topics within that, that you can provide. So, you know, it's really comes down to does it does it affect a lot of people? Is it seasonal? So is there an allergy that's happening this time of year? Is there something happening around the holidays? Is it you know, just a certain time of year statistics? Is there a new stat out that came you know from the federal government or something some new study that came out that was just really mind blowing. You can kind of hop on those topics as well, but really at the end of the day, you have to put yourself in the viewers perspective of why do I care? Why do I want to hear this story. And so the way the newsroom works is we will have meetings before you know different day parts of the news, the mornings, you're going to have more of the feelgood kind of lighter stories. And then you kind of move throughout the day, the afternoon, still a little bit of that. But as you get to the evening, we're really talking about those hard news stories. So to have someone like you, be a professional and be someone that can represent your industry and really give good hard news, facts and information. That's exactly what they're looking for.


Jared Fesler

Kelly, thank you so much for those those points and tips.


Jared Fesler

Yeah, I wonder how this differs sometimes retain local versus a regional or versus a national publication, knowing that a lot of nurses or at least a few nurses that are on this call today, as Alice mentioned, may have this separate business or, they have their own personal brand, from maybe from both perspectives. So if they're in the institution, or they have their personal brand, how do they take these steps to get to this national syndicated news where they're getting featured? Sometimes that happens, it's just it, you have the right story. But if this was going to be a concerted effort, like you growing your, your media career, how can nurses take those similar steps advanced through these stages, as you might call them? Or levels of media? What What advice would you give them?


Kellie DeMarco

Another great question, Jared, you're so good. Okay. So I would say this, first of all, and this is something I did early in my career at the time, I looked for people in my industry that I wanted to emulate. So for me at the time, I loved Diane Sawyer, I loved Katie Couric, and I just really followed them and really tried to emulate them. I know there are some superstar nurses that I've seen on past programs and webinars. And I know you have people that you watch and you follow just see what they do. See how they're interacting with the media, see what it is that they're putting out there? And emulate that. I do think it's important to start on a smaller level, because your first day out of the gate, like can you imagine my first day on TV, if I would have just shown up on Good Morning America, or, you know, nightly news, there's a reason that doesn't happen. There's a reason that when you get to that level, they want the people who have the experience, right.


Kellie DeMarco

So I think you really have to just like I did, put your time and efforts starting smaller. So I would say start with local interviews. Obviously, in our area, I mean, all across California, there are so many TV markets. And I'm happy Jerry to give you a list. In fact, there are all up and down this state different TV stations, it's not just LA and San Francisco, but you have you know, these smaller regions, Chico, Redding, Monterey, Salinas, Sacramento is kind of somewhere in between. But I would say once you get those first, and I'm talking TV now, but even newspapers, even radio, when you get those first interviews, you want to save those interviews, whatever they are, and you need to have a place where you're keeping those.


Kellie DeMarco

So I would suggest building out a Facebook page, building out a website, I know don't want your heads to be spinning and think, oh my god, I go spend all this money on a website. There's ways to create even a landing page and start to figure out how you want to brand yourself because the more of these interviews you get, the more people trust you, the more they see you and the more relationships you start to build within these media outlets. And guess what you want to be the one that they invite back time and time again.


Kellie DeMarco

For example, anytime there was a plane crash, or you know, something that happened within the airlines, we had a guy, he was a local professor at Sac State. And he was our guy, he was, you know, an aviation expert, a former pilot. So just like yourself, once you get in and you do a good job, they'll call you back, you're in their Rolodex, so to speak, and you'll keep getting called back. And then I think once you kind of build that out, then you can kind of go for some of those bigger stories, but I do think it's like, get the kinks out, get the practice in the smaller areas first smaller markets first and then kind of build your way up. But those you know, bigger markets are going to be looking for that experience that you have. So you've got to have almost like a living resume whether that's social media or your website.


Jared Fesler

Yeah, absolutely. I made two fantastic points there. Kelly and I think this might have been touched on a little bit in the in the policy panel. If not, it's definitely something we should cover in a future event and that is having that resume that's part of the reason why ANA\California setting up these media trainings. For nurses is answering kicking off. We're gonna announce this later, but our Amplified RN News Show that we're starting here at ANA\California. All right, and get, you know, you're gonna meet at professional media training. Now you have a live video of you taking on this opportunity and looking great on camera. Use this to your advantage. So when you do reach out to me, yeah, this sort of arsenal behind it.


Jared Fesler

You know, Kelly, I want to make this additional point as well, starting off locals not a bad thing at all. In fact, where do many of the regional national papers get their stories? From more local papers, right? So, you know, you could be utilizing that to your advantage, and try to get these media places. And maybe that's sort of the last question that I want to touch upon here is actually having that initial outreach. Again, we're going to be covering some of this in our mini media trainings. But from your perspective, what do some of these best practices for nurses look like? Especially in that first time, you've never talked with this, you know, outlet before you never talked to this journalist and newscaster? What are what are some of the best ways to come off? So you can hopefully engage in a media opportunity with them at a later date.


Unknown Speaker

So I think with that, you know, there's there's a really great way to recall we can there's different terms for it, you can kind of essentially piggyback on a story.


Kellie DeMarco

Perfect example, that doesn't have anything to do with nursing. But I had a client the other day, there's this huge banking story in California in Silicon Valley, which I'm sure you've heard about by now, they just did went through this huge shutdown. And one of my clients is a local bank. So they wanted to make sure that their clients knew how to get through what to look for when you're working with the bank. So they kind of piggy bank on piggybacked on that story. And then we offered that story up together. So you can do it on your own. You can work with someone like me, who has relationships with the media, and kind of, you know, work that way. Because there are certain key players that you want to reach out to, in a newsroom. When you call a newsroom, there's always a news desk, or they call it the assignment desk, you can look up any TV station, Google it, and they'll give you a phone number. And usually like a news tip, email line, and you can pitch your story ideas through that way. You can also reach out directly to a reporter in your market, I wouldn't necessarily reach out to a main anchor.


Kellie DeMarco

But you know, I know you all watch the news. And there's probably one or two reporters, you're like, she's really good. He's really good. Like, I really would want to work with him. Those reporters are looking for content. So if you have something great a good story idea, and you can be available that day, you're basically handing this on a platter to that reporter and that's what they want. And that may be more Jared for another deeper conversation about how to actually pitch news stories. But that's kind of the way that we go and start building relationships that way.


Jared Fesler

There's some great quick tips in there. Kelly, thank you for covering some of those. You're right. That's a whole that's a whole event in itself is building those relationships with media.


Jared Fesler

You know, we're just a little bit ahead of schedule here. But I think now actually might be a perfect time to take a small break. We're going to be launching right back in with Kellie DeMarco, so she's going to be going through how to look your best on camera. I think this is incredibly important session. So Kelly, thank you for your little bit of time. We'll take that quick intermission. And we'll see everyone right at the top of the hour. So we just have to have about 10 minutes. All right. Okay, thank you everyone. Thank you, Kelly.


Jared Fesler

Welcome back everyone, to Nurses in Media Day 2023. As we mentioned, at the start of this session, you know, nurses and media day is really taking a look at increasing your knowledge, skills and confidence when engaging with media. So we have to round out this entire day with actual media trainings. So I'm pleased to welcome back Kelly DeMarco, if you have seen Kelly's Instagram, then you probably know what's going to be happening next this talk but this so important. looking your best when having a media opportunity. Kelly thank you for coming back. Please take it away.


Kellie DeMarco

Absolutely. This is the fun part. Right? This is really for me it's so much fun to help you get through this part because really the gift for me and this may sound cheesy but I love when my clients feel that confidence they get on camera and they just own it like you know, right you know when you're wearing something that feels good, you got a good hair day going your makeups on one point, you just walk out the door with your head held high, right? So I'm gonna get into that in a minute. But But let me talk about first your goals. And I know we're going to get in with other speakers to your messaging, how you're going to say those things. And I can certainly help you with that at another time as well. But your goal is number one, to get your message across clearly and effectively. Right. It's also to be comfortable, and competent on camera. It's also to educate and engage your viewers with what it is that you want to share. It's handling questions with ease. And it's really just being a more effective leader and expert in your field. And I'm going to tell you this, even though you may not feel like it, sometimes you are an expert in your field, you know the ins and outs of nursing. So when you're called upon to do an interview, you got to put those blinders on. And just think about what it is what it is that you're here to do. And that's really to be the best version of yourself.


Kellie DeMarco

So that brings me to on camera presence, what is on camera presence, on camera presence is being your most authentic self is lining up that message visually, emotionally, verbally, right? It's all those things working together. And especially in a visual medium, like TV, we do have to talk about all the things right all the extra stuff that goes along with it. But I if you kind of look at it as fun, honestly, it's fun for me to get dressed up. Sometimes it's fun for me to look my best. I'm telling you, as I did just earlier that if you can take care of all this outside stuff, then you can really focus better on your message. So what I always start with my clients on is, let's talk about your background, because nine times out of 10. In this day and age, we're going to be doing interviews just like we're doing right now, which is virtually right, a radio conversation you're going to be calling in, they don't really have people going to the studio anymore. You may have something in person, if a reporter wants to come to you at the hospital, or wherever it is you work, possibly, but let's just assume for this example that it's virtual.


Kellie DeMarco

So first of all, we got to talk about your background. So in this little square that we are all in right now I see some of you are like, right here ready to go. And I also see okay, I know I see you Dr. James, I know you've been on TV before Jared told me about you. So I've been stalking you a little bit. Look at him. He's like sitting up straight. He centered in his picture, like on point, right? So what you don't want to do, okay, first of all, with your background, you want the background to be super basic. You don't want anything to be distracting. So what I did, I actually had a bunch of pictures up here. I took them down for this purpose. Because when you have a bunch of pictures of your kids, your vacation, your with your husband or partner in your bikini, you gotta like take that stuff down. Okay, you don't want people to be looking like Delilah. Oh, where is she on that trip? Whoo, what's your, what's your husband looking like I want to, you know, take all that out, okay, so you can just have something I just have like a basic plant. Because it for me media, I have one of my Emmys and one of my awards and just something super basic for you that may be it could be a credential, it could be just a couple plants, a couple of nice faces, but something that is super, super basic, basic, the better.


Kellie DeMarco

Okay. Um, you also in this little square, I see some of you who are down a little bit, right like this, right. So even on my I'm on a big computer now, but on my laptop, what you can do, if you are on a laptop, is you want to make sure when you're looking in this square that you are perfectly centered in this square and that there's very little headroom up here. So if you're down here, and you're doing an interview down here, this is not going to look good. If you're back here kind of hanging out. Right you want to have good posture and sit up and really take up that square and to be honest with you. This is good for any of these zoom interviews whether or not you're working with you know a client or your doctor Kimberly, I see you moving that camera looking good girl.


Kellie DeMarco

Okay, so you centering yourself up, right, everybody's looking good now and you want to come nice and close. The other thing you want to do okay, so everybody this is what I do a lot of times with my clients because whether you're on a laptop or internet computer point to where your camera is, So can everybody just point to your camera. Okay, so that is where you're going to look unfortunately. Okay, when I was in a TV studio, the cameras were like this big and the you know, the face and the you know, it's right there. I know where the camera is, but you have to remind yourself and if you have to take little, I got something in here. Take a little post it right? If you have to do this, let me see if you have to do this, okay, if you got to make a little arrow and stick that right on your camera, then do it. Okay? Watch the difference. If I'm talking to you, look, I'm engaged. I see you, you see me, right? We're talking. It's weird, because out of the corner of my eye, I'm seeing all these strangers. I don't know anyone you could be, you know, sticking your tongue out at me, I can't see. But I'm looking right at you. I am being engaged. I'm leaning forward a little bit and looking at you.


Kellie DeMarco

Now watch the difference, if I'm giving an interview like this. So, you know, we're talking about COVID today. And, you know, we're really want to make sure that everybody's staying safe. I mean, look at the difference. I'm not even, I'm not engaged, right? Or if it's just you, and you're looking at yourself, I get it, we're looking at ourselves a lot more now. And we're like, Ooh, I gotta get my hair, getting my hair done, I gotta fix my makeup, right? You got to just ignore yourself, right?


Kellie DeMarco

Look into that little camera. And you want to make sure here's ladies always loved this trick, you want to make sure that the camera is at least eye level. So if you are on a laptop, that's fine. Just what I do, I will take a stack of books, about six to 10 inches of books, or Amazon boxes. I know you guys got a lot of those, right? It doesn't have to be pretty, right? Just put your laptop up on a stack of books so that you're here because guess what, if you are looking down, or you're looking down at the desk at the camera, guess what you're gonna get, you're gonna get like three chins. And ain't nobody got time for that, right? We don't want to look bad. We want to look thin, we want to look like we're here. We want to look our best self. So lift up your camera with anything you have in your house. And then here's the other thing that's really really important. Clean your camera off. Sometimes the camera just want to laptops and stuff, you can just take a little cloth, clean that camera off.


Kellie DeMarco

I noticed sometimes, you know, when you take pictures and it looks blurry. It's because we just have, you know, oils from our skin. So wipe the camera off, okay. And then lighting is key. And for TV, they want you to be lit. Okay, that sounds bad. Not that kind of lit. I know what you're thinking, let's like lit up like you're in a studio, right? So if you have a ring light, you're already halfway there. I can put a link when I'm done of the ring light that I use.


Kellie DeMarco

Honestly, as much as we do virtual stuff. Now it is worth investing in a ring light. If you've got a ring light that's this big. It's better than nothing. But honestly, it doesn't do that doesn't do anything. Okay, so you want to ring light that's at least 18 inches. And I have I can send you the link of the one that I got on my Amazon account if you don't have a light, okay, and if you don't have the money, I mean, I think my light was probably, I don't know, 70 bucks. I know it sounds like a lot. But honestly, I use it every single day. This is where we are now right? And at least go out looking toward a window, right. I don't usually like to have a window behind me. But I have another kind of studio thing set up in here. So this is what I got.


Kellie DeMarco

But I would say if you don't have a light, just make sure that you are facing a window not behind you. But in front of you. Natural light looks the best. It just looks the best. Okay, so that's all the background information. Are we good with that? So we've got be lined up in the picture, lift up your camera, simple background, good lighting. If you want to do a microphone, you can do that. I always think it's best to do a microphone. Again. It's another investment. So I don't want you to go out and spend a bunch of money. I want you to work with what you have. Is there. Was there a question? Delilah, do you have a question?


Attendee

You read my mind. I was gonna ask you what do you what type of microphone do you recommend?


Unknown Speaker

Yeah, so there's a bunch of them on the market honestly, I mean, I have a lot of different kinds. I have a Yeti microphone, it's a little bit bigger.


Unknown Speaker

So I can either plug that into my computer. The other thing and I don't have it here without going downstairs. But if you are doing an interview, you can do it on your phone. They actually have and I can link this to on Amazon, their wireless mics that just go right on your lapel. And it actually just plugs into the bottom of your phone. It's really cool. It's just it's like in a TV studio, you'll wear a microphone and it just picks up the sound better. And then just obviously, if you're home, you got to make sure it's not when the gardener's here or the kids were running around. The dogs barking you just got to be careful though. They kind of understand. Okay, so let's get into how am I on time, Jared?


Jared Fesler

Okay. Yeah, you're doing great. And I think we might even have at some small amount of time for q&a.


Unknown Speaker

Okay, perfect. Okay, so I want to get through what's nice about this group is usually we do I work with people on hair, makeup and clothes. The clothes part. I'm going to say this to you because you are in the medical field. They want you in a medical outfit trust me, trust me. They want you in scrubs. Whatever you got, but but there's a big but I don't want your scrubs with like kitty cats and spaceships. Okay, I know there's really cute ones out there. In fact, I was just getting my mammogram yesterday and I'm like, those are the cutest scrubs I've seen. But you don't want that for TV. So you want solid, the solid blue ones or green or whatever colors that you have, or a jacket. If you want I've seen I know Dr. James has probably done this. You can wear this the stethoscope, that's a little but they love TV. They love stuff like that. Okay, so the nice thing is is your outfit you don't really have to worry about it. But still Just keep it basic. Basically what I tell my clients is, everything is solid, like this color, jewel tones, the reds, the pinks, the purples, the yellows, greens, no pattern, no shine, no lace, nothing see through nothing low cut. You never ever, ever, ever want to show cleavage. If you can, this is probably the most that I would go but I would never wear something super low cut. So your outfits pretty much dialed in. So that's good. Hair, I just always say just keep it basic. Keep it nice and simple. I mean, really, if there's anything that you can take away from this, the more simple the better. So I just want you to keep everything simple hair, simple. Jewelry, simple. I wouldn't wear anything bigger than like a little drop earring. No big hoops. No big medallion. No, like, whatever you got, like just none of that. I would say think about if you want to have a watch great. Your ring and earrings. That's it. I wouldn't even add bracelets because honestly bracelets will cling together, they'll make noise just keep it as basic as you can.


Kellie DeMarco

Okay, so makeup is the thing, and Jared kind of talked about my Instagram. Sometimes people are like, Oh, do you just do makeup? No, but Instagram is just where I do a lot of makeup tutorials. And you can follow me there. It's just at my name at Kelly DeMarco. So I do a lot of makeup tutorials. But makeup is really, really important. And here's why. When you are on camera and you have lights, it will make you look dead like flat dead like you just rolled out of bed, even if you think that you have a little something on so that doesn't mean were more.


Kellie DeMarco

But it means definitely wearing the right color foundation. So making sure that you're matching, definitely using contour. And definitely using you know a blush and lipstick color that is probably going to be a little bit darker than you may or may not wear every day. So every day, this is the makeup that I use. And I'm not going to do a pitch on this makeup. But I love this and I actually have a lot of my clients use this because everything I need is in this one little palette. So I have my foundation, my contour, my bronzer, and my blush, I would go a little bit darker than that for a blush. And I would definitely go darker than that for lipstick. Even if you feel like you're wearing too much. Here's what I do, even before I sat down on here, if you're doing a zoom interview, just pull up your resume beforehand, sit down, get in place 10 minutes before, pull up your resume and start a new meeting and just check yourself out because you'll be able to look then and say okay, oh God, I didn't know I had this hair on in place or Oh, I do really, you know, see the new I just like I sat here and I was like, oh, gosh, I got a little little more color here. Right?


Kellie DeMarco

So and definitely, definitely, you want to get powder. I will tell you this will be your best friend and I can link these to a just a clear translucent powder. That's this. It's just clear. Make sure that there's no no shine, nothing that is distracting. So that's kind of like my super quick.


Kellie DeMarco

I guess CliffsNotes for some of the media training that I do, and I can certainly help you kind of walk you through the makeup. It's you know, I think one on one. It's different. But one of the things that I do, because I think it's so important is I even do the men's makeup. I the CEO of the bank that I do a lot of TV spots with, I do his makeup. I have his colors. Because it's important that you don't want people looking at something that's distracting. You want them listening to what you're saying and not what you're wearing or what your hair looks like or how weird Your makeup is. That makes sense.


Jared Fesler

Kelly that's amazing. I'm thankful for a cloudy yet sunny day. So I at least look like I'm following your advice for today's media thing. We have a couple of hands raise. Dr. Anita Gerard and then we'll move on to the next


Dr. Anita Girard

Yeah, hi Kelly, thanks for the tips. Can you help us out at all with requested backgrounds, I get that all the time that people wants but specific backgrounds, you have any tips because with my blonde hair, it's almost impossible to keep my head of hair in the picture. Do you have any tips on that?


Kellie DeMarco

I get that. And honestly, I'm gonna, I'm just gonna say it. I don't love virtual backgrounds. Look, I love Jared, I'm looking at Jared and Chelsea's there, they actually look really nice. Some of them look better than others. But what you get with virtual is like, you're floating in space, right? Or you move your hand and then it looks like these big sausage fingers, right? Like, I don't know what why they haven't figured out virtual yet. There are some backgrounds and I saw someone on here earlier, Whitney, do you have a virtual background? Here's this. Okay, so Whitney, raise your hand, so everyone can see you. That's a virtual background, it looks good. So you can Google that look for backgrounds. But just be careful. I mean, I have, for example, I've got a client, who That's New York Life. And I always tell them, Look, people are trusting you with their money, they don't want to see some weird background that doesn't look like it goes anywhere, they want to see that you're a real person in a real space. So I think if you can do, you can find a little corner of your house or find a room that has good lighting, I say, do it don't just sit up at the kitchen counter and throw a virtual background. It's okay for a Zoom meeting. Maybe not even that, but I get it. We're all working from home. But I think better is just real is better. You just look better if you look and do that test. And you know, right that I was telling you about. And if you look in that test, and you're like, I don't look right, and you don't feel good, then you're not going to perform well. Right. So I want you to feel your...


Dr. Anita Girard

I guess I'm more I never use virtual backgrounds unless requested by you know, if you're presenting for AARP or whoever they request that use the virtual backgrounds like ah, I know. Just say no.


Kellie DeMarco

Yes.


Jared Fesler

Dr. Christy Campo.


Attendee

Hi, thank you, Kelly. What about glasses? Yes, no, I mean, I prefer my glasses, but I can wear contacts? Does it matter for the camera?


Kellie DeMarco

Great question. So if you can, I would say if you can go without do it. But I don't really have an issue with glasses. It's just the reflective lens. So if you've got a lot of reflecting going on, it's really distracting. And they may actually ask you to take them off. So I would have you say if you can wear contacts, that's better, especially in a studio, there's a lot of different lights. But I also I still think glasses are nice. I think they make you look smart. I really do. I just You just want to be careful with the glare. Right?


Kellie DeMarco

Again, it's just like a big shiny spot on your forehead, if you've got a glare. That's what they're going to be focusing on and not you. And look all of this, I don't want it to be overwhelming. I just want you to think about these things. Because you want that first impression to be just like knock their socks off. You want to look professional and look the part because you want them to ask you back again.


Kellie DeMarco

And again, this is how you build out that living resume, you build out your website, right? It's just always looking your best. And I guarantee you, when you look your best, you feel your best and you just present your best. So if the glasses are something that you can't do without great, I know I've read I've read before that you can take a little bit of powder. Try that, but I don't want them to be foggy either. So play around with that and see what works. Thank you.


Jared Fesler

So I just wanted to make sure Robin, you had your hand raised there for a second. If you had a still had a question.


Attendee

It was basically about the glasses. Because when I tried to ring light, I always get that so but I will try without my glasses. If I raise my, you know, my lineup so I can see the camera. I think I'll be okay. I think thank you. Yeah.


Kellie DeMarco

And again, just test and look at yourself or take a picture. The other thing I always tell my clients do is you can record, just practice practices. So when I do that a lot with my clients is I just I literally sit here and practice and I will throw questions at them. Record it and then go back and watch yourself. And if there's something that's distracting, something doesn't look right. That's the beauty of video, right? You can go back and fix it. Make a little change, go back again. And then kind of get yourself you know, in a place that you want to be. Thank you,


Jared Fesler

Kellie. This is awesome. Excited to have you back here and event coming soon. Just we'll put that plug in later but just amazing material. Thank you so much for joining us and having some time. Really appreciate it.


Kellie DeMarco

You bet and I'll put my email in the chat. So if anyone has any questions for later I'd love to connect. Awesome. Okay, thanks ladies and guys.


Jared Fesler

And next we have a one of my favorite people Dr. James Q Simmons. Just like on Instagram again, maybe I'm just living on Instagram too much but I always see your face and I'm always tuning into your face. Yeah, cuz I'm excited to have you here to do some, you know, real life. Once you're on camera, what do you do? Maybe even with these hands, but if you don't mind leading thanks for joining us, James.


James Q Simmons

Yeah, Jared and, and ANA\California Thank you very much for having me again, my name is Dr. James Timmons and I'm going to I'm starting with all of Kelly's wonderful, amazing tips. And then I'm going to violate all of them. I'm gonna like, I'm gonna lean in a little bit on you, I got my glasses on, you know, the my head is shiny, I have no powder on my head whatsoever. I do have a big ring light. You can see it there and my glasses, but we are here for training. Right? So we are going to dig into some training because you've taken all of Kelly's steps, right? And the makeups. Right? The backgrounds right except my background right looking at I got like a dead palm tree coming out on my shoulder, right? Maybe sometimes you don't want to have that.


James Q Simmons

But you got your background, right? You got your glasses, right, you got your lighting, right, I'm using air pods as audio. I don't love it. But my microphone wasn't and I weren't getting along about an hour ago. And so I decided you know what, always have a plan B, that's always part of this whole thing is to have a plan B. And Plan B is really easy to have at home. By the way, if you have a microphone, great if you have air pods, great. If you have the wired ones, I've had to use that on a national cable platform before because my plan A and B failed. So I went to Plan C, it didn't make a difference. So you definitely want to have those backups, your technology backup, right? It's the worst when you have technology issues. So all of that saying, all right, you are now finally on camera. You've got all that stuff together.


James Q Simmons

Oh god. What do I do now? Right? They're gonna ask me these questions. And you've done your homework, and you're ready, and it's about to be live. And you're like, wait a minute, how do I handle this interview? How do I handle this whole thing lives.


James Q Simmons

So I have some tips and tricks for you. They are some of them are my own kind of what I've crafted on my own through doing this for years. Some of them are things that I've been taught this is the mishmash of those two things. But I've seven total were seven, seven, there we go. Seven total trick for you. So get ready to write these things down. Okay for them our big picture, and we'll start with the big picture for and then we're going to go down to the three in the moment in the literal heat of the moment, when it's maybe a live interview, what do you actually do?


James Q Simmons

So, you know, as Jared mentioned, I do a lot of social media. I am also I do, I'm on KTLA at least every other week, sometimes once a week, that is the number one news station here in Los Angeles. I do both. Sometimes they're more nuclear programs. And then I do sort of a more fun light hearted afternoon program with them.


James Q Simmons

I have done you know, I won't go through the through the whole resume, I was going to show you my reel. But I've done major cable platforms, all different types of television, all different types of radio and podcasts. And one of the things I have gotten really good at is being able to handle these questions on the fly. And as your level of exposure grows, as you get out there more and more into the media. They're not always going to be these beautifully, perfectly curated experiences where someone has sent you questions 24 hours beforehand, you've been able to do your research on them very thoroughly. You've vetted those questions and your answers with the media department, if you're speaking on behalf of your organization, right. That doesn't happen a lot. You know, per our conversation earlier.


James Q Simmons

I actually, I'm a hospitalist at a hospital. They know exactly what I do. I do all of these things on the media and whatever. As Dr. James Simmons have asked for the NP, I do not speak on behalf of my hospital. They love what I do. They fully support me sometimes they even allow me to film there if I need to. But our agreement is that I don't speak on behalf of the hospital. Right? So I don't have a media part department that support me it's about these questions, right? So you gotta get really good at doing that beforehand. So your big picture for for things I want you to write down I really want you to think into the lean into them. Right? I guess that's though, that was the word just a couple of years ago, lean into these big four things when you're preparing.


James Q Simmons

And number one is preparation, right preparation is the separation. So a lot of people have talked about, you know, when you come on camera, you give a great, great presentation. You give a great interview, you're honest and expert and whatever mean them having you back them wanting to work with you again is what will separate you from other people. And that is because you are coming into this prepared, right? So if you are one of those lucky ones who've got questions beforehand, you get to work with a producer. Oh, let's talk about this segment. You know, tomorrow on, KTLA I'm talking about the dangers Brazilian Butt Lift, right? I get to be an expert on that. I am not, I don't work in plastic. I'm not a plastic surgeon. So there's some research I got to do with this, right.


James Q Simmons

But we, as nurses, are experts, we can speak to these things. So as the nurse who might educate their patient after a procedure for a Brazilian Butt Lift, I'm going to be able to educate millions of people on KTLA tomorrow about the dangers of Brazilian Butt Lift, right? I've got some time to prepare for that. But what I also know is that the anchors that I work with are very fun and funny and a little bit goofy. And they like to ask them lots of questions. So this is not great. The question in the segment about Brazilian Butt Lifts is 90 seconds. So I'm just going to prepare a 90 second talk about what I would tell a patient after they got a Brazilian Butler. Oh, no, I gotta dig in. I got to be really prepared. I got to anticipate their questions, I got to think about what a patient might ask me.


James Q Simmons

Because as anchors, and Kelly can speak to this, and other people who have worked in news can speak to this. They are trying to be the ears and the voice for the audience. So those anchors are going to ask you questions that they think their audience has. So you got to think in that terms, you got to get ahead of that. And that actually leads me to point number two is know your audience, right. So the audience that watches this KTLA afternoon program is primarily people who are home at 2pm in the afternoon, it's primarily 35 to 55 years old, it may skew even larger, it's about 60% women. So I know the demographic of the audience I'm talking to that is very, very, very different than when I am on Bob, the drag queens podcast, and we're talking about HIV testing, right? People who listen to Bob the drag queens podcast, there may be more people who listen to Bob the drag queens podcast and tune into the KTLA afternoon show. They are becoming just as important of a medium and excellent place for nurses to have our voices heard and really be able to contribute.


James Q Simmons

But I'm clearly tailoring my message. I'm not changing who I am. And we're going to get to that in a minute. But I'm clearly tailoring My message to Bob the drag queens audience when we're talking about HIV testing, versus the demographic that are going to be on KTLA watching in the afternoon on a Thursday.


James Q Simmons

Okay, so preparation is key. And part of the way you prepare that number one part of the way you prepared number two is knowing the audience that you're going to be talking to, I had the privilege of being interviewed by the head of the President of AANP last year giving the the clinical update on the AANP podcast about new changes in HIV clinical care. So what are we doing with undetectable equals on transmittable? What are we doing with new antiretroviral medications?


James Q Simmons

The clinical presentation to an audience of nurse practitioners who care for HIV patient in the clinical setting is a very different tone of conversation, a different audience than the people who might need HIV testing and be on the patient's side of that scenario who are listening to Bob the drag queen podcast. That makes sense. So preparation is separation, how you prepare is knowing your audience.


James Q Simmons

Okay, that's the biggest key in preparing point number three, authenticity.


James Q Simmons

I cannot stress this enough. You have to be yourself. I think we all let me try to do it here. I'm not even very good at it anymore. But I think we all grew up learning and watching people on TV talk to us like this. And then people will read and say, well, that is an excellent question, my friend. How nurses feel about the vaccine and COVID is very interesting. Nobody talks like that, right? That's not how you would talk to your partner, to your colleagues at work that nobody talks like that at all you need to be your authentic self. Now you need to be your professional self, you know, and professionally. I probably swear a little bit too much in my personal life, but I make sure that I well that when I'm on television when I'm on radio when I'm on podcast, right? So I can still be very authentically Dr. James which is kind of a gregarious out there fun guy. I talked too much with my hands like Jared was mentioning earlier, right? You caught you do want to keep those hands down below. I talked, but here we're training, right? So I talk with my hands. I'm a super engaging, dynamic person, sometimes I talk a little bit too fast, right? I can still be myself.


James Q Simmons

But on television, it's about slowing down a little bit. That's like Kelly said, I'm looking at that camera because I'm engaging and connecting with you, just like I would in a normal conversation. And I can tell you that preparation is separation, how you prepare is knowing your audience. And number three is being authentic, I can tell you all of those things and what is uniquely a James cuse them and voice without having to be buttoned up and acting like what I think people think I should act like on television, right? Gone are those days, okay, we're not doing that anymore.


James Q Simmons

And then the last thing kind of relates to point number three is number four, it's that conversation. So same thing, nurses, this is not a podium presentation, which I love. And I love presenting my research. But when you're on television, on the radio, on social media, understanding the venue that you're in, can make all the difference with the audience that you're connecting with. So a podium presentation, and you're, you know, trying to dig into an under, you know, an undervalued P, with, you know, your end was only 500. In a study, you thought it was going to be 1500. And you're digging into the data of your research is very different than you having 33 and a half seconds to talk about that research on CNN, right? Because it was awesome, huge groundbreaking research.


James Q Simmons

So your conversational if Don Lemon, who's on CNN, I guess he's now in the morning on CNN is asking you a question. You will you're going to answer that as if you're being conversational with Don Lemon. Don Lemon, okay, not as if you are presenting something. Okay. So the big picture things I want you to think about, once you're finally on camera, once you're competent, your lighting is right, your glasses are off all of the things right, you don't have plants growing out of your neck, all those things is preparation is separation, and it will separate you from other experts. Part of the reason that people like Alice and me and other folks, you know, Barbara Glickstein, who's coming on, I think after me, so many of us get asked as nurses to continue repeatedly over and over again to contribute on large media platforms, whether that's radio, television, podcasting, in Hollywood, all of those different things is because they know we're going to come correct. We're going to come prepared. We're going to come conversational, we're going to come knowing the audience, we're going to come knowing what this outlet is looking for. Okay, so preparation is the separation. Know the audience of the outlet. You're going on to be yourself and speak conversationally. Okay, those are the four big picture one. Now, I see we have a couple of questions, too. So I'm gonna leave a little time for that. Okay, because I know I'm talking really fast with 15 minutes. Is that a long time? So our three smaller items, right? Seven total items I want you to take away, we just did the four big picture ones. So now in the moment, there's these are three tips. Oh, God, I'm on camera. This anchor just asked me a question.


James Q Simmons

You know, one of my favorite places to do news, by the way, is in Bakersfield. So I live in Los Angeles. But there's an outlet in Bakersfield that called me all the time, they called me almost daily through COVID. And I was doing almost daily update from COVID. And we all grew and learn about COVID together, and I got to know them really well. They got to know me really well. And people are like, Well, Dr. James are on these big platforms, and you do all this stuff. And you still do Bakersfield? Yes. Because I'm I do this to educate the public. And I do this because I'm passionate about it. And I do this to help elevate our profession and what we can do in the media. It's not about the platform or or you know how big it is. But also, I learned so much from these people at at this new station at Bakersfield, and we all grew together. And they knew that I was coming prepared. I was speaking authentically, you know, I was sharing my experiences. I was being conversational, and they're just a fantastic outlet.


James Q Simmons

And one of the things I learned from them from this particular anchor who would always like to throw me for a loop is if I just needed a moment to respond to his question. I knew the answer, but how do I put it in the right words? is simple. Just repeat the question.


James Q Simmons

This does a couple of things, buys you a little bit of time. Okay, it also, if this is being edited into something down the road, whether it's for your own reel, right, Kelly talked about having a living reel, make all these clips, take everything you do and own it, by the way, you need to have all of those, ask them to send them to you. It's not a big deal, okay?


James Q Simmons

Not only does it make editing easier for your own, but then it makes editors for these news organizations and all these organizations, it makes it easier for them to edit it into really nice looking and sounding sound bites. Right? So I don't know if Jared, were to ask me a question. Oh, Dr. James, how do you feel about you know, the the president the status of COVID being a national emergency is ending in May. Can you tell us your thoughts on that and how you think it'll affect the communities you serve? You know, you know, Jared, the presidential emergency declaration ending in May, is really going to impact the communities I serve, because so many of the communities they serve are underrepresented, right? You'd see that it made for a nice continuity of conversation. I didn't look like I was reaching for my thought. But I was like, oh, boy, I know what I want to say. But I gotta gather my thoughts. And your brain will guide you in the right direction and trust it. If you repeat that question out loud. All of a sudden, you already know the answer. And you know how you want to say it, because you trick your brain into thinking the answer in the right way.


Jared Fesler

Now in conversation, someone asks us, you know, a girlfriend asked a question over a glass of wine and sushi. And they're like, Oh, how do you feel about you know, The Last of Us on Sunday? Whoo, girl, that episode was crazy, right? I can't believe right, we should jump right in and answer the question. So that part feels a little weird. But if you want to buy yourself some time, make life so much better for producers and editors. And that be another notch in your belt for why they call you back. Just repeat the question. Okay. The other trick with that, too, even if you know what you're gonna say, even if you are like, this is good. I don't need a minute to think we're rolling. I actually only have 17 seconds, and they have 18 More questions that they want to get to. Right. We're like, we're going back and forth. just piggyback off of the very last word that someone says, or the last several words that they say.


James Q Simmons

We all actually do this a lot in our normal lives, and we don't even realize that we do it, do it. That's interesting, James, because we do piggyback off of each other a lot. A lot is right, piggybacking.


James Q Simmons

It's something that I do all the time. Hi, I'm as crazy because I think I'm running out of time right now on jerath. About to shut me up at any moment. Moment is really what we're having right now together with you. And right, you see how I picked up on each one of those words, I just piggyback off of myself. So if you piggyback just on the last word or a couple of words, it makes for this unbelievably clean, lovely conversation. Even if it's live that that you buy at the end be like oh my gosh, I felt like a complete idiot. I didn't answer the questions very well. I took too long. I was rambling on. I didn't really get to my point. And then when you go back and watch it, you're like, wow, we covered so much in two and a half minute. And it felt like the most seamless, easy conversation with this person that was interviewing me because I literally just said, and just don't overthink it. Literally say the last word that they said. Said, it's really hard sometimes to just allow our brains to do the work for us. And just say the last word that one thing that, you know, that's really interesting, Jared because blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, right? Just say the last word go right into it. It's very natural, I promise you, the audience will say, wow, they need to have that Nerf gun more often. She was really great. Like, she totally knows her stuff, right? She's made for TV, all that stuff that she's saying, Wow, that person is really good. Kelly are so great. Dr. James was so great.


James Q Simmons

I mean, Alice Benjamin is a master at this, right? She gets thrown for a loop on NBC constantly. And I know Alice, so I know that she's like, I need 13 seconds to think about this. But she's so good that she'll just piggyback off of the last four or five words. It looked like the most seamless thing on earth. And then she's pulled up all her preparation from the back of her brain that she did. And then out it comes and you're like wow, that was incredible. And all Alice did was that little trick of just piggybacking off of the last word.


James Q Simmons

And then the very last thing tip I will give you so this is tip seven. This is Tip three of in the moment right but tip seven total is answer the question first and then explain. And this is something that I'm kind of bad at, I really, really have to work on this, as long as I've been doing TV.


James Q Simmons

We, especially in the United States have a tendency to explain ourselves, and why we feel some kind of way, and why we think something, and then get to the punch line, and then get someone to lead because we're protecting ourselves, right? Well, you know, really, if we require that, you know, patients families are unable to come into the hospital, because it's really protecting the patient and the family and all of this, and we want everyone to have back pain before they visit their their family members with COVID.


James Q Simmons

When that person said, our family members allowed into a patient's hospital room because they have COVID, COVID. No. Patient Family members are not allowed into patient's rooms when they have COVID. Here's why, Bob, because we're protecting those families. Right? Answer the question first, directly, then you will have some time to breathe into.


James Q Simmons

Why that's your answer. I promise you, they'll give it to you. Okay. Especially if you're showing up prepared, you know, their audience, you're being conversational. You're piggybacking off that last word, or several words, you're repeating the question, you can even repeat the question and then just answer it directly. But what we have a tendency to do is they think throwaway lines do not recommend us. We all say that. Well, Bob, that's a really great question. You know, why don't we allow patients families into rooms that have COVID? Well, you know, at hospital X, Y, and Z, we're all about not only keeping our patients safe, but the community safe. And what's really important to us and our safety. Nobody wants to hear that. They want to hear the answer. And then they want to hear your explanation.


James Q Simmons

So no more Bob, that's a really great question. You take anything away from this whole training with me, by the way, stop saying that, that's a great question. Why our patients will allow it in because it's dangerous. No families are not allowed into patient COVID rooms still at hospital X, Y and Z. And but let me tell you why. It's because that makes sense, though, the capital off and then I'm done. Jared, I promised preparation is the separation come in prepared. Know the audience as best as you can have the outlet that you're going on to Okay, Morning News in your local community is different than a drag queen podcast is different than a gamer on Twitch who might have 4 billion people watching. They love you. They want to have a nurse on and all of a sudden you're you're talking to 4 billion gamers about the gala. Right as a different audience than Morning News. Okay, know your audience, yourself authentically.


James Q Simmons

I'm not saying to be like Dr. James, come on and squared and ask them to breathe in your hands are going all over the place or whatever. But be yourself in a conversational way with the person that you're talking to. And then when you're in the moment, don't be afraid to repeat the question. It buys us time it makes editing and production value goes through the roof. It's great. piggyback on that last word or two, if you're not going to repeat the question or it's a conversation because grab the last word or two, say it out loud, and then go on with what you're saying. And then most importantly, answer the question that they're asking you directly for and then give you an explanation.


Jared Fesler

James, I mean, so good. And so little amount of time, I can tell you right now that my wife should be listening in in the background, because I always explain myself before giving her the answer. And she's like, not again...


James Q Simmons

We all do. I'm guilty of it as well.


Jared Fesler

I know we have a few questions here. Deb you raise your hand first and then we do need to move on to our next presenter. So Deb, if you want to unmute real quickly. Thank you.


Attendee

Thank you, Dr. James, for the great tips. As a nurse, I'm not accustomed to researching media audiences, that sort of thing. Is it appropriate for me when the interview is being set up to say, tell me a little bit about your audience? or what have you found that your audience best relates to? Or is this something I should just research independently on my own?


James Q Simmons

The answer to your question is yes. And yes. So it is very appropriate to ask. In fact, that is one of those things that will separate you from other experts that they will have on Wow. Okay, Debra really gives a crap about our audience, right? The ironless where their dev get really give the crap about our audience. She really cared she's not in that for Deb. She's in that for our audience outlets love that, right? They don't want you to come on being like, well, I've got something to sell or I'm trying to elevate my own personal platform or whatever you're there to help them. You ask a question like, hey, KTLA, what's your audience like during this, I want to make sure that my message is gonna resonate with your audience. Oh, my God, you'll have eaten out of your head. They will love you forever.


James Q Simmons

So it's absolutely okay to ask for that. Also, Google is your friend Nielsen. Ratings is your friend. All of these things are public. There's lots of demographics out there that you can find if you just do a little pre work.


Jared Fesler

And, Elissa, I'm so sorry. Just a little bit of time constraint here. If you want to put your question in the chat, and maybe James can stick around and try to answer that, James. Thank you, Sarah. Always a pleasure having you.


Jared Fesler

Yes, Alyssa. My chat has been disabled, which is why I haven't done anything. Go ahead. Yeah.


Attendee

Thank you. So I want to thank the speakers already, because I couldn't do it on chat. Thank you.


Jared Fesler

Awesome. Thank you. That's great to have you. James. Thank you so much. Pleasure having you today. We'll chat again soon.


Jared Fesler

And next we have the amazing Barbara Glickstein. You've probably seen her face before. I know we've been mentioning her name. We've been doing media trainings with Barbara for some time now. Barbara, love what you do. And such an important topic for today, you know, probably could have had this before the James in terms of an order. But nonetheless, framing your message. Couldn't be more important piece of this overall conversation about media today. So excited to have you. And I'll let you just jump right into it.


Barbara Glickstein

All right. Thank you. And thank you, Dr. James, it's fun to follow you. I'll add one more point to the last question, which is listen in tune that program on a read that journalists articles. In addition to those two grade poi