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Priority Bills For The Legislative Session Are Here!

Happy Spring Recess!
During this Legislative Session, ANA\C has been diligently reviewing a wide array of bills that address critical issues affecting the nursing profession, environmental health, and the ongoing maternity ward crisis in California. The bills highlighted below represent ANA\California's top legislative priorities for the current session.
We encourage you to explore this list of priority bills and understand how they stand to impact not only the nursing profession but also the overall quality of life and health for all Californians. ANA\C remains committed to advocating for legislation that advances the nursing field and promotes the well-being of our communities.

 


Quick Highlights:


Read the full legislative update below.

 


Workplace Violence


Aligned with our Coalition Partner: California Emergency Nurses Association

 

This bill would make an assault or battery committed against a physician, nurse, or other health care worker within the emergency department punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year, by a fine not exceeding $2,000, or by both that fine and imprisonment. 


Update: The State Assembly voted unanimously to pass the amended bill. The bill is in the State Senate, where it will receive its first reading and be assigned a new Senate bill number and Author. The Senate bill will then be printed for 30 days and assigned by the Rules Committee to the appropriate committees to be reviewed by legislators. 


Support: California Hospitals Association, California Medical Association, Sacramento County Sheriff Jim Cooper, Sutter Health, Stanford University Medical Center

Oppose: Drug Policy Alliance, California Public Defenders Association, ACLU California Action


Increasing Equitable Access to Nursing Schools



This bill would authorize the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges to develop a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Pilot Program to 15 community college districts statewide. The Chancellor would identify eligible districts based on equitable access to the program:

  • Underserved nursing areas

  • Communities with persistent poverty

  • Regions with a projected growth rate above 7% from 2025-2030

An evaluation of the pilot program would determine the effectiveness, as well as the need to continue or expand the program. 


Update: This bill was referred to the State Assembly Higher Education Committee. No date has been set. 



This bill would authorize the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges to develop a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Pilot Program to 15 community college districts statewide. The priority would be given to districts in underserved nursing areas. An evaluation would be conducted of the pilot program to determine its effectiveness and the need to continue or expand the program. 


Update: This bill is currently on the calendar to be heard by the State Senate Education Committee on April 10th at 0900.



This bill would mandate the Nursing Education and Workforce Advisory Committee (NEWAC) at the Board of Registered Nursing to undertake a comprehensive study. The study would examine how approved nursing programs uphold clinical education standards, manage clinical placements at healthcare facilities, and coordinate these crucial hands-on learning experiences for nursing students. Upon completion, NEWAC would be required to submit its findings and recommendations from this study to the Legislature for review and potential action.


Update: The bill was updated with amendments during the 2nd reading by the Author. It has now been referred to the Business Professionals and Economic Development Committee to be heard with the revised bill. No date has been set.



This bill would add “living in a medically underserved area or population” as a life experience/special circumstance for the multicriteria screening process option, if the number of community college registered nursing program students exceeds capacity.


Update: This bill is currently on the calendar to be heard by the State Senate Education Committee on April 3rd at 0900.


Maternity Ward Closing Crisis



This bill would require an acute care hospital that offers maternity services, when at risk for closing in the next 12 months to provide information to California Department of Health Care Access and Information (HCAI) and California Department of Public Health(CDPH)  to include: 

  • Staff working in maternity ward

  • Staff shortage

  • Deliveries per month over the past 12 months

  • Patients on commercial insurance served

  • Patients on Medi-Cal served

  • Prior and projected performance on financial metrics from the past 12 months

  • Demand in services


The bill would also require that within 6 months of receiving notice, HCAI in conjunction with the CDPH must conduct a community impact assessment to determine the 3 closest hospitals offering maternity services in the geographical area and distance from the maternity ward at risk. 

The at risk hospital would provide public notice of potential closure to include the results of the community impact assessment.

The public would be permitted to comment on potential closure for 60 days after notice is given & the hospital would be required to host at least one public hearing


Update: This spot bill has been amended with language and re-referred to the State Assembly Health Committee on March 19th. 


Environmental Health Bills


Aligned with our Coalition Partner: California Nurses for Environmental Health and Justice


This bill would require the State Superintendent of Public Instruction (SSPI) of the California Department of Education to develop a pilot program to test and remediate lead contamination in drinking water at participating local educational agency facilities with plumbing installed before 2010.

The pilot would entail: 

  • The 6-10 local educational agencies include an agency with free meal programs to students and schools in disadvantaged areas.

  • If sampling results excess 5 parts per billion for any potable water system outlet, parents and guardians of the students must be notified no later than 30 schooldays after receiving results 

  • The local educational agency must take immediate steps to shut down all potable water system outlets where lead levels exist

  • Ensure Lead free drinking water would be provided at each portable water system that elevated lead levels were detected

  • Additional testing would be conducted of the elevated lead contaminated potable water system outlets

  • An investigation would be conducted to determine the source of lead contamination

  • Grants would be provided to the educational agencies for testing and remediating drinking water lead levels 


Update: This bill will be heard by the State Assembly Education Committee on April 3rd at 1330. 


Support: Children Now (Co-Sponsor), Environmental Working Group (Co-Sponsor)

California Nurses for Environmental Health and Justice, Climate Health Now 


Opposition: California Association of School Business Officials


Aligned with our Coalition Partner: California Nurses for Environmental Health and Justice


This bill would require an agricultural commissioner to require a notice of intent to be submitted before pesticides are applied within ¼ mile of a school site. The Department of Pesticide Regulation must report:

  • The specific method applying pesticide, including exact start and end dates and times of the application. 

  • The Director of the Department of Pesticide Regulation to evaluate the pesticide use enforcement program and its effectiveness. 

  • This bill would then expand to private schools grades K-12.


Update: This bill will be heard by the State Assembly Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials Committee on April 9th at 1330.



This bill would prohibit public schools from providing any food with specific substances including red 40, titanium dioxide, blue 1, blue 2, green 3, yellow 5 & yellow 6.


Update: This bill will be heard by the State Assembly Education Committee on April 3rd at 1330.


Implicit Bias Training in Healthcare



This bill aims to address implicit bias in perinatal care by mandating an initial implicit bias basic training focused on all birthing individuals. The training would be required for all healthcare providers involved in delivering perinatal care. Additionally, each healthcare facility that offers perinatal services would be obligated to incorporate this implicit bias training into their staff development programs to ensure compliance and ongoing education.


Update: This bill will be heard by the State Assembly Health Committee on April 2nd at 1330.



We want to hear from you!

If you are passionate about a bill that is not included in this list, please reach out to advocacy@anacalifornia.org. We welcome your ideas, thoughts, and advocacy efforts surrounding particular pieces of legislation. At ANA\C, we are committed to supporting our members' advocacy initiatives and amplifying the voices of nurses on the issues that matter most to our profession and the communities we serve.

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